#ChemCoach Carnival: From Big Pharma to Non-Profit
Oct25

#ChemCoach Carnival: From Big Pharma to Non-Profit

We're almost at the end of National Chemistry week, folks, and the Haystack is finally kicking in to blogger SeeArrOh's now rampant #ChemCoach carnival. The goal of any carnival is to get a lot of different bloggers to post on the same topic--in this case, to write about how they got to where they are today as a way of educating young chemists on their career options. Round-ups of the dozens of posts this week can be found here, here, and here. Since the science writing field has been well covered here and by our own Carmen Drahl, and because the Haystack is focused on all things pharma, I thought I'd enlist the help of someone with a much more illustrious career than my own. Without further ado, I give you some words of career wisdom from TB Alliance's chemistry guru Christopher Cooper: Your current job.   I’m Senior Director of Chemistry at the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development (TB Alliance), a non-profit, product development partnership headquartered in New York City.  My job encompasses all chemistry activities for the Alliance from early-, mid-, and late-stage drug discovery right through drug substance/API manufacturing for clinical trials.  The TB Alliance is dedicated to identifying safe, novel chemical entities for the rapid treatment of tuberculosis worldwide, and my job is to oversee the Alliance’s chemistry needs to achieve our goals (seewww.tballiance.org for more details). What you do in a standard "work day."   Define “standard” … oh, and define “work day,” as well, please? All kidding aside, working for a small (~45 employees), entrepreneurial, research and development organization means that every day is truly different, whether it’s engaged in project team discussions with collaborators in Chicago and Belgium, or proposing new analogues/chemical series to pursue with chemists in Auckland or Seoul!  In fact, as we engage chemists (medicinal, process, manufacturing) on TB Alliance projects around the globe, my work “day” doesn’t really begin or end.  After all, if it’s 9:00 P.M. on the East Coast, it’s already 9:00 A.M. in Beijing!  Fortunately, the virtual nature of our business model translates into my own flexibility in addressing issues wherever and whenever they occur … and I don’t have to wash my glassware anymore (yey!). What kind of schooling / training / experience helped you get there?   In many ways, my background would appear fairly conventional, despite the more unconventional nature of my current position.  I received my B.S. from Clemson University in 1980, and my M.S. (1982) and Ph.D.’s (1988) from Stanford.  Having worked briefly in the pharmaceutical industry (CIBA-Geigy from 1982-1984), I was eager to return so I accepted a position...

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J&J Could Score Priority Review Voucher with Bedaquiline NDA
Jul02

J&J Could Score Priority Review Voucher with Bedaquiline NDA

Janssen Research and Development, part of J&J, has asked the FDA to approve bedaquiline, a diarylquinoline to treat multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. If given the green light, bedaquiline would be the first drug with a new mechanism of action to be approved for tuberculosis in over four decades. Janssen points out that the pill would also be the first drug approved for multi-drug resistant TB. If approved, Johnson & Johnson will score a Priority Review Voucher, an incentive created in 2007 to prompt more R&D in neglected disease. A PRV, given to a company that wins U.S. approval for a new drug for neglected disease, is a coupon good for shaving the review time for another new drug application. The value of that coupon depends on the drug its applied to—in theory, if a drug has lofty sales potential, gaining a few extra months (as we’ve written, it could shorten the FDA’s decision time by anywhere from four to 12 months) could translate into hundreds of millions of dollars. To date, Novartis has been the only company to be granted a PRV, which it gained through the U.S. approval of the malaria drug Coartem. But that first test of the incentive had some questioning its value, as Novartis cashed in its PRV for a supplemental new drug application for Ilaris, an antibody for auto-inflammatory disorders that brought in just $48 million last year. So, readers, any thoughts on how J&J might cash in its PRV if granted?...

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Can A Pasta King Bring Generic Drugs To Sub-Saharan Africa?
Mar16

Can A Pasta King Bring Generic Drugs To Sub-Saharan Africa?

Last week, Lisa wrote a story about India-based Cadila Pharmaceuticals becoming a partial investor in a proposed drug manufacturing site in Rwanda. This guest post from C&EN reporter Linda Wang explains another partnership in that vein. Cameroonian billionaire entrepreneur Celestin Tawamba is hoping that the enormous success he’s had in building a pasta empire in central and sub-Saharan Africa can be replicated in his latest endeavor—to establish a state-of-the-art generic drug production facility in his native Cameroon. In April 2010, Tawamba, who is widely known as “the pasta king,” launched Pharmaceutical Industrial Company (Cinpharm S.A.), in Douala, Cameroon. With financial backing from foreign investors such as Cipla, India’s largest pharmaceutical company, cinPharm has started blister packing and distributing generic drugs, including paracetamol, ibuprofen, metronidazole, amoxicillin, and cotrimoxazole. Cinpharm will also produce generic anti-malaria, anti-TB, and anti-retroviral drugs as well as drugs against gastrointestinal and other diseases prevalent in central and sub-Saharan Africa. The drugs are currently supplied in bulk by Cipla, but cinPharm hopes to one day manufacture its own pharmaceuticals. The ability to blister pack drugs in sub-Saharan African is significant because it helps to lower the cost of imported drugs, which can be extremely expensive and unaffordable for most Africans. "Local drug production may soon fill the empty shelves in local pharmacies and finally take care of alleviating chronic drug shortage," says Rolande Hodel, president of AIDSfreeAFRICA, who alerted C&EN to Cinpharm’s activities. Tawamba’s rapid rise to success with his pasta business is impressive. According to a July 15, 2009, article in the Cameroonian business journal, the Entrepreneuer, Tawamba took out a loan in 2002 and set up La Pasta S.A. in Douala, producing 25 tons of flour and spaghetti. Seven years later, the company was producing 250 tons of pasta and had employed 500 workers. With more than 300 employees and plans to hire additional scientists, Cinpharm is fast becoming one of the largest employers in Cameroon. Hodel says AIDSfreeAFRICA is supporting Cinpharm by helping to raise awareness about the company and recruit chemists with an interest in working in Cameroon. For more information about Cinpharm and other drug production efforts in Cameroon, visit AIDSfreeAFRICA’s...

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AstraZeneca, MMV in Malaria Research Pact
Jun28

AstraZeneca, MMV in Malaria Research Pact

Yet another company is opening up its molecular vault to help speed the development of drugs for neglected diseases. AstraZeneca will allow the non-profit Medicines to sift through the 500,000 compounds in its library to test for activity against P. falciparum, the worst of the malaria parasites. MMV has enlisted Vicky Avery, professor at the Eskitis Institute for Cell and Molecular Therapies at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, to conduct the screening. If Avery finds any promising compounds, AstraZeneca will start investigating their viability as drugs out of its Bangalore, India, R&D facility. The deal marks the second neglected diseases-related pact signed by AstraZeneca in recent months. In May, the company teamed with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development to create a joint portfolio of compounds active against tuberculosis. AstraZeneca joins the growing ranks of pharma companies moving beyond simple donations of medicines to actually devoting resources and lab time to the development of desperately needed new treatments for diseases like malaria, tuberculosis, and sleeping sickness. Among the recent efforts by pharma firms: GlaxoSmithKline and Alnylam have established a patent pool that is open to any researcher working on neglected diseases;  Lilly, Merck, and Pfizer have created the Asian Cancer Research Group, a non-profit that will generate a freely-available pharmacogenetic cancer database; and Merck and Wellcome Trust have set up MSD Wellcome Trust Hilleman Laboratories, a lab in India that is expected to eventually employ some 60 scientists, all working towards finding or improving vaccines for the developing...

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