Biotech, Pharma, & VCs Offer Rare Disease Patient Groups Some Advice
May13

Biotech, Pharma, & VCs Offer Rare Disease Patient Groups Some Advice

Today’s issue examines the surge of interest in rare disease drugs, which in the past few years have attracted significant interest from biotech firms, big pharma, and venture capitalists alike. In addition to exploring the business and policy drivers behind increased investment in orphan drugs, the multi-part story looks at the critical role patient organizations play in drawing attention to rare diseases. As such, it seemed worth highlighting advice from various stakeholders on what patient groups can do to entice drug developers to work on their disease: --Organize yourselves. Find as many patients as possible, and establish a registry that will make it easy for a drug firm to begin a clinical trial. “Beginning to identify people, getting them into a registry, and collecting natural history data is one of the most valuable things a developer can have when they’re thinking about a program,” says Genzyme’s CEO David Meeker. "Among the most helful things that patient advocates can do is to help us to understand the natural history of disease," agrees Kevin Lee, CSO of Pfizer's rare disease unit. "Without that understanding of how the disease progresses, and what the endpoints can be, its almost impossible to do drug development." --Find a way to collaborate with one another. In even the smallest of diseases, patient groups tend to proliferate. And while its natural and understandable for advocates to want to do all they can to help their own child or family member, it can lead to duplicative efforts. The disparate groups can also make it tougher for drug developers to access. “We all need to give everybody a lot of space here to do what they think is best, but in an optimal world, there are tremendous advantages to being coordinated,” Meeker says. --Be connectors. Patient organizations have the amazing ability to bring together academics who had previous not collaborated. “What I have found over and over again is that patient advocates know the investigators in their field far better than the investigators themselves do,” says Christopher Austin, director of NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS). “They can be instrumental there.” --Get the right researchers interested. Often only a handful of academic researchers are working on a given rare disease, and drug developers say attracting new scientists into the field, while also giving careful consideration about who to fund is key. Patient groups should look for someone who can use advocacy funds to attract larger grants. "If they can get some grant support, you'll get more done," says Emil Kakkis, CEO of Ultragenyx. "If they can't get any grant support, you'll have to wonder if it was just...

Read More
GSK Highlights Rare Diseases Approach
Oct18

GSK Highlights Rare Diseases Approach

GlaxoSmithKline today outlined its strategy in rare diseases, while also unveiling its latest licensing deal in the area. Created in February, the rare diseases unit will focus on four therapeutic areas--metabolism, central nervous system and muscle disorders, immunoinflammation, and rare malignancies and hematology—and will initially chase treatments for 200 diseases. “We believe that focusing on 200 diseases is a good compromise between the enormity of the task and what we can really address with the team we have in place,” Marc Dunoyer, head of GlaxoSmithKline’s rare diseases unit said on a call with reporters this morning. Pursuing treatments for 200 diseases seems ambitious. After all, the rare diseases unit is comprised of just 30 people who work with scientists in GSK’s 38 discovery performance units as well as leverage outside opportunities. But Dunoyer pointed out that roughly 3,000  rare diseases are rooted in genetics, which provides natural starting points for drug discovery campaigns. Further, the company appears to be looking for deals that bring technologies that can be applied across a range of diseases. The company has already established a small network of partners with edgy drug discovery technology. Prior to the creation of the unit, GSK paid $25 million upfront for Prosensa’s PRO051, an RNA-based therapeutic now in Phase II trials for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. GSK then bought the rights to a number of enzyme replacement therapies from JCR Pharmaceuticals. In March, GSK signed a broad pact worth up to $1.5 billion to use Isis Pharmaceuticals’ antisense technologies to develop therapies for rare diseases. Today, GSK announced a partnership with Italian charity Fondazione Telethon and research organization Fondazione San Raffaele for the development of gene therapies based on the patient’s own bone marrow. In exchange for $14 million upfront and the promise of milestones, GSK gains access to a gene therapy that has completed Phase I/II trials in ADA severe combined immune deficiency, more commonly known as “bubble boy disease,” which affects just 350 children worldwide. The organizations will use the stem cell technology to develop treatments for a variety of other rare diseases based on single-gene mutations. GSK isn’t the only drug company with a newfound interest in rare diseases. In December, Pfizer started a rare diseases unit, which recently set up an R&D group in Cambridge, Mass. Sanofi-Aventis has for months been trying to buy Genzyme in order to bolster its rare diseases portfolio. Novartis has also become interested in rare diseases as a foothold into larger...

Read More