AstraZeneca, MMV in Malaria Research Pact
Jun28

AstraZeneca, MMV in Malaria Research Pact

Yet another company is opening up its molecular vault to help speed the development of drugs for neglected diseases. AstraZeneca will allow the non-profit Medicines to sift through the 500,000 compounds in its library to test for activity against P. falciparum, the worst of the malaria parasites. MMV has enlisted Vicky Avery, professor at the Eskitis Institute for Cell and Molecular Therapies at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, to conduct the screening. If Avery finds any promising compounds, AstraZeneca will start investigating their viability as drugs out of its Bangalore, India, R&D facility. The deal marks the second neglected diseases-related pact signed by AstraZeneca in recent months. In May, the company teamed with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development to create a joint portfolio of compounds active against tuberculosis. AstraZeneca joins the growing ranks of pharma companies moving beyond simple donations of medicines to actually devoting resources and lab time to the development of desperately needed new treatments for diseases like malaria, tuberculosis, and sleeping sickness. Among the recent efforts by pharma firms: GlaxoSmithKline and Alnylam have established a patent pool that is open to any researcher working on neglected diseases;  Lilly, Merck, and Pfizer have created the Asian Cancer Research Group, a non-profit that will generate a freely-available pharmacogenetic cancer database; and Merck and Wellcome Trust have set up MSD Wellcome Trust Hilleman Laboratories, a lab in India that is expected to eventually employ some 60 scientists, all working towards finding or improving vaccines for the developing...

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Open Innovation: A Panacea for Neglected Diseases?
May06

Open Innovation: A Panacea for Neglected Diseases?

Can open innovation accelerate the development of drugs for neglected diseases like tuberculosis, malaria, and sleeping sickness? It certainly can’t hurt, but the circumstances need to be just right, if a recent experiment by GlaxoSmithKline is any indication. Yesterday at BIO, there was a news conference to announce the expansion of the Pool for Open Innovation against Neglected Tropical Diseases, a collection of patents and know-how related to those diseases. M.I.T. is the first university to contribute intellectual property, and South Africa’s Technology Innovation Agency (TIA) is the first government organization to sign on as an end-user of the resources. GSK established the patent pool in February 2009, and Alnylam opened access to its 1,500 patents related to RNAi last summer. But the program seemed to languish in the following months, a situation seemingly caused by confusion over what to do with all that patent information. In January,  the non-profit BIO Ventures for Global Health joined as a third-party administrator of the pool, and will help link academics, non-profits and biotechs to the right information and human resources available through the project. After all, freedom to conduct research without fear of patent infringement is great, but only helps if scientists know how to turn an idea into a drug. The hope is that momentum will build now that BVGH has signed on as a matchmaker between those contributing patents and know-how and end-users of those resources. As BVGH's CEO Melinda Moree found, a broad request to pharma often goes nowhere, but if BVGH can help users hone their needs into granular “asks”—help in formulating a drug, or advice on how to make a product heat stable, for example—drug companies are quick to help. Skeptics will wonder if the program is more about creating good will than substantial scientific progress. Moree says BVGH had similar concerns, and asked some hard questions before signing on as its administrator. “We had to assure ourselves before taking on the role of third-party administrator that the parties involved were actually really serious about seeing drugs come out at the other end. We don’t have time to waste,” Moree says. GSK’s commitment goes beyond merely opening up its patent vault. The British firm will allow scientists to spend time at its Tres Cantos R&D facility in Spain in order to speed their drug discovery efforts. South Africa’s TIA, which supports 12 biotech firms, including four focused on neglected diseases, plans to take advantage of that offer. The Tres Cantos site can accommodate up to 60 visiting scientists, who are expected to stay between six months and a year, though the most likely scenario will be for small groups to come on a rotating basis....

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