BMS Cuts R&D Jobs
Aug01

BMS Cuts R&D Jobs

The ax is falling on more pharma R&D jobs. Earlier today, Derek Lowe brought word from readers that research jobs were being cut at Bristol-Myers Squibb. The company just confirmed that "fewer than 100" positions were being eliminated in the U.S. Here's the official word from BMS: "Bristol-Myers Squibb is strategically evolving the company’s Research focus to ensure the delivery of a sustainable, innovative drug pipeline in areas of serious unmet medical need and potential commercial growth. The Company is aligning and building internal capabilities to support the evolution of its Research focus. In doing so, certain research areas will be streamlined and there will be investment and growth in other areas. This strategic evolution has resulted in job eliminations in the short term to allow longer term investment. This initiative will result in a reduction in employee headcount of fewer than 100 people in an R&D organization of more than 7,000 employees. Impacted employees were notified on August 1, 2012 and transitions will take place within two weeks of this date." The company will not confirm whether they are, as Derek's sources suggest, in the metabolic disease area or limited to New Jersey. If indeed they are all coming out of its N.J. labs, today's announcement will add to challenging times for the state.  As we wrote last month after Roche announced plans to shutter its Nutley site, costing some 1,000 jobs, the number of drug industry jobs in N.J. fell by 22.4% between 2007 to 2010, according to a report by Battelle and the Biotechnology Industry...

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Genzyme R&D Layoffs Today
Jan31

Genzyme R&D Layoffs Today

The other shoe has dropped at Genzyme, which last year was acquired by Sanofi, but had yet to experience the kind of major research restructuring that typically accompanies the integration of two pharma companies. Today, Genzyme scientists were told whether their job was being shed or moved. Here's an excerpt from the official statement: As part of the integration process between Sanofi and Genzyme, R&D activities were reviewed and assessed. On January 31, 2012, the results of the review of U.S. R&D Genzyme activities were announced, including synergies that unfortunately make some positions redundant. All US R&D Genzyme employees impacted by the integration received notice regarding whether their position would be relocated or eliminated. The job cuts are separate from the latest round of R&D layoffs at Sanofi. As readers might recall, Sanofi announced last November that it was closing its Bridgewater R&D site, and move discovery and early development activities to Boston. A Sanofi spokesperson tells the Haystack that despite today's cuts at Genzyme, the company is committed to its presence in Massachusetts, and to maintaining a stable level of jobs there. While R&D is falling under the axe, the company is hiring in manufacturing and multiple sclerosis, she says. The company has not provided details on how many R&D scientists will be shed, but once more information comes to light, we'll update...

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Haystack 2011 Year-in-Review
Jan03

Haystack 2011 Year-in-Review

Well, 2011 is in the books, and we here at The Haystack felt nostalgic for all the great chemistry coverage over this past year, both here and farther afield. Let’s hit the high points: 1. HCV Takes Off – New treatments for Hepatitis C have really gained momentum. An amazing race has broken out to bring orally available, non-interferon therapies to market. In October, we saw Roche acquire Anadys for setrobuvir, and then watched Pharmasset’s success with PSI-7977 prompt Gilead’s $11 billion November buyout.  And both these deals came hot on the heels of Merck and Vertex each garnering FDA approval for Victrelis and Incivek, respectively, late last spring. 2. Employment Outlook: Mixed – The Haystack brought bad employment tidings a few times in 2011, as Lisa reported. The “patent cliff” faced by blockbuster drugs, combined with relatively sparse pharma pipelines, had companies tightening their belts more than normal. Traffic also increased for Chemjobber Daily Pump Trap updates, which cover current job openings for chemists of all stripes. The highlight, though, might be his Layoff Project.  He collects oral histories from those who’ve lost their jobs over the past few years due to the pervasive recession and (slowly) recovering US economy.. The result is a touching, direct, and sometimes painful collection of stories from scientists trying to reconstruct their careers, enduring salary cuts, moves, and emotional battles just to get back to work. 3. For Cancer, Targeted Therapies – It’s also been quite a year for targeted cancer drugs. A small subset of myeloma patients (those with a rare mutation) gained hope from vemurafenib approval. This molecule, developed initially by Plexxikon and later by Roche / Daiichi Sankyo, represents the first success of fragment-based lead discovery, where a chunk of the core structure is built up into a drug with help from computer screening.From Ariad’s promising  ponatinib P2 data for chronic myeloid leukemia, to Novartis’s Afinitor working in combination with aromasin to combat resistant breast cancer. Lisa became ‘xcited for Xalkori, a protein-driven lung cancer therapeutic from Pfizer. Researchers at Stanford Medical School used GLUT1 inhibitors to starve renal carcinomas of precious glucose, Genentech pushed ahead MEK-P31K inhibitor combinations for resistant tumors, and Incyte’s new drug Jakifi (ruxolitinib), a Janus kinase inhibitor, gave hope to those suffering from the rare blood cancer myelofibrosis. 4. Sirtuins, and “Stuff I Won’t Work With  – Over at In the Pipeline, Derek continued to chase high-profile pharma stories. We wanted to especially mention his Sirtris / GSK coverage (we had touched on this issue in Dec 2010). He kept up with the “sirtuin saga” throughout 2011, from trouble with duplicating life extension in model organisms to the...

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Are the Green Jobs All in China?
Sep09

Are the Green Jobs All in China?

Three articles in this week’s Washington Post and New York Times examine the question of whether the shift to clean energy will really create more U.S. jobs or just hasten the shift of jobs to China. It seems like there is strong evidence for the latter case. Today’s New York Times covers the news that the United Steelworkers union plans to file a case with the Obama Administration accusing China of violating free trade rules in its subsidies for exports of clean energy equipment. Here’s a taste: “The union says the violations have helped Chinese companies expand their share of the world market for wind turbines, solar panels, nuclear power plants and other clean energy equipment, at the expense of jobs in the United States and elsewhere. The filing asks the Obama administration to begin formal proceedings at the W.T.O. in Geneva to force China to repeal the subsidies. “Unless China’s policies are urgently addressed, the U.S. may never get a fair shot at making the green technologies of the future,” the filing says.” Yesterday’s Washington Post ran a business opinion column by Steven Pearlstein that looks at the structural dilemmas behind high unemployment in the U.S. and hits on a similar trade theme: "The reason there were 8 million additional jobs back in 2007 is that demand for goods and services was artificially - and unsustainably - inflated by cheap, plentiful credit. "Bringing down our trade deficit “either by producing more of what we consume (fewer imports) or more of what other countries consume (more exports) - represents the path toward sustainable, long-term job creation. "The problem with that strategy is that for the past two decades we have allowed our industrial and technological base to deteriorate as talent and capital were grossly misallocated toward other sectors of the economy, even as other countries were able to attract the investment, the technology and the know-how to serve the U.S. and global markets.” AND, he writes, “our companies are disadvantaged by an overvalued currency or unfair trading practices.” Also in yesterday’s Post, a must-read example of a factory shut-down that will result in 400 lost jobs in spite of U.S. clean technology innovation. Where the author writes “lighting industry” one could easily substitute “solar industry” or “battery industry.” “During the recession, political and business leaders have held out the promise that American advances, particularly in green technology, might stem the decades-long decline in U.S. manufacturing jobs. But as the lighting industry shows, even when the government pushes companies toward environmental innovations and Americans come up with them, the manufacture of the next generation technology can still end up...

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Jobs Do Exist
Feb03

Jobs Do Exist

Those of you who follow C&EN writers on Twitter may have noticed the small blitzkrieg of tweets (a twitzkrieg?) announcing open positions at C&EN. We're looking for two assigning editors for C&EN's ACS Journal News & Community department. Read the full job description/qualifications and apply here. Contrary to what the job ad has listed, location may be...

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