In Print: Racing Cells, Baby Dinos
Nov11

In Print: Racing Cells, Baby Dinos

The Newscripts blog would like to be closer Internet buddies with our glossy print Newscripts column, so here we highlight what's going on this week’s issue of C&EN. Microscopic organisms, start your engines! The second World Cell Race is upon us. Doping and steroids in the form of genetic modifications and unusual cell types are welcome in this competition to create the fastest and smartest cellular contestant. As C&EN associate editor Nader Heidari writes in this week's print column, this year's World Cell Race will be held on Nov. 22 at the BioMEMS Resource Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, in Boston (watch the live broadcast here). The cited purpose of the race is to inspire discussion about how cell motility plays a role in health and disease. The Newscripts gang also wouldn't be surprised if cell biologists were champing at the bit to enter a (relatively) high-speed racing contest. Unlike the inaugural World Cell Race in 2011 that featured a linear track, this year's race will force champion-hopefuls to navigate a maze-like course. Creating "smart" cells that don't just Roomba their way into a dead end will add another dimension of design complexity. Nader says the organizers haven't entirely revealed just how these souped-up cells are expected to make wise decisions on their paths to victory, but he's putting his money on stem cells. "They're pretty fast," Nader says. "Some went up to 5ish µm a minute! This next contest will have molds, however, so we'll see how they compare, even though they'll need special tracks because of their size." The second part of Nader's Newscripts discusses a keen-eyed teen who was first to spot a fossil on his high school's trip to Utah's Grand Staircaise-Escalante National Monument in 2009. While traipsing through rock formations on an exploratory trip led by paleontologist Andrew A. Farke, high schooler Kevin Terris peeked under a stone and ended up discovering the smallest and most complete fossil of the dinosaur Parasaurolophus yet. Farke's research group has been investigating the fossil and has recently published a paper about the baby dino, whom they've endearingly nicknamed "Joe." And Nader tells the Newscripts gang that the researchers think it's unlikely they'll discover anything quite like it again: "Joe's find is a ridiculously rare glimpse into childhood development of these dinos. It's crazy to find a relatively complete baby dino fossil, mostly because they tend to be bite-sized morsels for predators and have softer bones that wouldn't fossilize as well." Nader adds that the paleontology team "had a very tiny geological window to find and preserve the fossil as well. Farke doesn't think he'll ever find another such fossil in...

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