Heptares solves first X-ray structure of Family B GPCR, but full details not yet public
Sep17

Heptares solves first X-ray structure of Family B GPCR, but full details not yet public

In what might be the year's biggest molecular teaser, Heptares Therapeutics has announced that it has solved the first X-ray crystal structure of a G-protein coupled receptor in the Family B subclass. The work provides the first structural insights into a protein family that includes sought-after drug targets such as GLP-1 for diabetes and CGRP for migraine. Largely because of that drug discovery relevance, however, Heptares is choosing to keep its structure somewhat close to the vest. Officials presented views of the structure, of a GPCR called Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF-1) receptor, at conferences on Friday and Monday. But Heptares CEO Malcolm Weir says his team has no immediate plans to publish the structure or to deposit coordinates into the repository known as the Protein Data Bank. The structure, Weir says, is another success for Heptares' GPCR stabilizing technology, StaR. The technique involves targeted mutations that help to trap a GPCR in a single biologically-relevant state. In the case of CRF-1, Weir says, the stabilized receptor is captured in the "off" state. The structure itself, which is at a resolution of 3 Ångstroms, has the 7-helix membrane-spanning structure typical of GPCRs. However, CRF-1's architecture is rather different from receptors in Family A, the only GPCR family for which X-ray structures had been available until now, Weir says. "The overall shape of the receptor looks different, the orientation of the helices looks different, and there are detailed differences within helices that are at analogous positions in Family A receptors," he says. He notes that there are differences in helices 6 and 7, which undergo important motions during GPCR activation. "This is an important breakthrough, although fine details of the structure and release of coordinates may still be some time away," says Monash University's Patrick Sexton, an expert in Family B GPCRs who was at Friday's talk. The structure, he says, confirmed researchers' expectations that the major differences in membrane-spanning helices between Family A and Family B receptors would occur on the extracellular side. "There was a very open and relatively deep extracellular binding pocket, with the receptor having a 'V' shaped appearance," he says. This open pocket likely contributes to medicinal chemists' difficulties obtaining high affinity small molecule ligands for Family B receptors, he suggests. That open pocket might be involved in another Family B GPCR mystery, according to Roger Sunahara, also in attendance Friday, who studies GPCRs' molecular mechanisms at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. All Family B GPCRs, including CRF-1, have a large domain at their amino-terminus that contains large portions of their ligand binding sites. That domain was not included in this structure, he says, but...

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