“Top Chemistry Moments of 2013” Google Hangout #topchem 1/9 3PM Eastern
Jan06

“Top Chemistry Moments of 2013” Google Hangout #topchem 1/9 3PM Eastern

UPDATE 1/10/14: View the archived webcast here: Everyone loves a good year-end roundup. Chemists are no exception. But condensing a year's worth of discoveries into a neat little "top 10" package is bound to stir up some discussion. What goes on the list? Who got left out? We hope you readers will help hash out these questions at C&EN's second Google Hangout, "Top Chemistry Moments of 2013". It's on Thursday, January 9, at 3PM Eastern US time. For those new to Google Hangouts, they are video chats broadcast live on the web. You can watch from Google Plus or YouTube. After the chat is finished it is archived on YouTube for anyone to view. Join the Hangout here. Carmen Drahl and Lauren Wolf will speak with Laura Howes and Ashutosh Jogalekar about the people and the research that made chemistry news in 2013, and talk about what to watch in 2014. Follow the conversation, and ask questions to the speakers on Twitter using the hashtag #topchem. Laura Howes is Editor of Science in School, the European journal for science teachers that highlights cutting-edge research and teaching. She is a former science correspondent for Chemistry World magazine. Follow her on Twitter at @L_Howes. Ash Jogalekar does molecular modeling at Ensemble Therapeutics, a biotech startup in Cambridge, MA focused on using the specific base-pairing properties of DNA to synthesize novel macrocycle drugs. Ash has been blogging at "The Curious Wavefunction" for about eight years and at Scientific American Blogs since 2012. His main interests are in the history of chemistry, in understanding the relationship between chemical models and reality, and in studying chemistry as a tool-driven rather than an idea-driven revolution. Follow him on Twitter @curiouswavefn. Lauren Wolf is an associate editor at Chemical & Engineering News. Follow her on Twitter @laurenkwolf. Carmen Drahl is a senior editor at Chemical & Engineering News. Follow her on Twitter...

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Join “Countdown to the Chemistry Nobel!” Google Hangout #chemnobel – UPDATED
Oct02

Join “Countdown to the Chemistry Nobel!” Google Hangout #chemnobel – UPDATED

Who's going to take home the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry? Will chemistry's most coveted honor go to (GASP!) a biologist? Is there any point to all this pre-Nobel speculation? Maybe not, but there's no denying chemists enjoy taking part in the conversation. That's why we hope readers will tune in to C&EN's first Google Hangout, "Countdown to the Chemistry Nobel!" this Thursday, October 3, at 3PM Eastern US time. For those new to Google Hangouts, they are video chats broadcast live on the web. You can watch from Google Plus or YouTube. After the chat is finished it is archived on YouTube for anyone to view. Join the Hangout here. Carmen Drahl and Lauren Wolf will speak with Neil Withers and Paul Bracher about the runup to this year's prize, which will be announced Wednesday, October 9. What predictions are out there already and how reliable are they? Why did so few people predict that Dan Shechtman would win the Nobel Prize for quasicrystals? Watch for a discussion about these and other questions. Follow the conversation, and ask questions to the speakers on Twitter using the hashtag #chemnobel. UPDATE 10/2: I'm excited to announce another guest has joined the hangout: Simon Frantz. Simon Frantz is Editor of BBC Future, and a former senior editor of Nobelprize.org. Follow him on Twitter @simon_frantz Neil Withers is Features Editor for Chemistry World magazine. Follow him on Twitter @neilwithers Paul Bracher blogs at Chembark, and is Assistant Professor of Chemistry at St. Louis University. Follow him on Twitter @Chembark Carmen Drahl is a senior editor at Chemical & Engineering News. Follow her on Twitter @carmendrahl Lauren Wolf is an associate editor at Chemical & Engineering News. Follow her on Twitter...

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This Week on CENtral Science: XPRIZE Science, Nanotech Safety, and more
Sep20

This Week on CENtral Science: XPRIZE Science, Nanotech Safety, and more

Tweet of the Week: OH: OMG, she LOVES biology. When she gets drunk, that's all she talks about.— LeighKrietschBoerner (@LeighJKBoerner) September 20, 2013 To the network: Cleantech Chemistry: Cool Planet Wraps Up $60 Million Funding Round Fine Line: ChemOutsourcing: Day Two and ChemOutsourcing: Day One Newscripts: XPRIZE Competition Poses Ocean Acidity Challenge and Amusing News Aliquots and From Unknown Bacteria To Biotechnology Breakthrough The Safety Zone: Nanotechnology: Small science can come with big safety risks The Watch Glass: Tiny Solder and Gas Masks for Three Year Olds and Women in Cleveland's Chemistry Labs during WWII and The Orion Nebula and Detector Dogs for Forensic...

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Welcome Food Matters at Scientific American Blogs- Chemistry Represent!
Sep03

Welcome Food Matters at Scientific American Blogs- Chemistry Represent!

Recovered from your Labor Day barbeque? Good. Because something's cooking at the Scientific American blog network, and it is decidedly meaty. I'm talking about the SciAm network's new food blog, Food Matters, which launches today, in time for Scientific American’s Food Week celebration. This group blog features seven authors- three researchers and four journalists, and includes a familiar face (more on that later). According to Bora Zivkovic, who heads the network, at Food Matters "there will be explainers of basics, coverage of new papers, carefully researched pieces of in-depth journalism, pushback against non-science-based activism, posts that provide historical context, and just plain fun stuff from original multimedia to quirky recipes." And chemists, if that's not enough to whet your appetite, consider this: the blog's authors include Julianne Wyrick, who holds a B.A. in biochemistry, and friend of CENtral Science See Arr Oh. I asked them some questions ahead of the launch and here's what they had to say. (Quotes edited for grammar and/or shortened for brevity). Carmen: Why do you think food is a great medium for talking about chemistry and biochemistry? Julianne: Food touches everyone; from biochemists to ballet dancers, we all eat. Discussing the chemistry involved in food and nutrition helps science come alive to scientists and non-scientists alike. See Arr Oh: People are surrounded by food, but they don't always take a second to realize that food is all about chemical processes- from photosynthesis, to preservatives, to digestion. C: Why is it important to have chemistry representin’ on the big blog networks? J: Blogging about the chemistry involved in topics like food is important because chemistry is the foundation for so much of science. Many processes, like how a nutrient affects the body, boil down to chemical reactions. If we know more about the chemistry, we have a better understanding of the process. S: There's a stereotype that may be in some people's minds of chemists holed up in their labs, drumming up massive profits for corporations. I'd like to show that chemists can be relatable and fun and communicate well. Congrats on hitting the bloggy big time, you two. Now, make sure you commission some guest posts from the likes of Matt Hartings and Martin Lersch, and then I'll really be...

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Guest Post: “Google Glass and Twitter for Chemistry Education” by Arash Soheili
Aug06

Guest Post: “Google Glass and Twitter for Chemistry Education” by Arash Soheili

Today’s guest post is from Arash Soheili, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center. As curator of the Twitter account @Total_Synthesis, which is turning 2 this month, no new total synthesis in the journals escapes his watchful eye. He’s passionate about teaching chemistry. And we’re jealous of him because he got to visit Google’s NYC offices to pick up his very own Google Glass. Check out his tech musings at Android Cowboy. I love organic chemistry and have been practicing it in academia and industry for over a decade. I’m also a huge fan of technology and strongly believe that there is a place for it in chemistry education. In fact, I would even say that in the next decade it will become a necessity to incorporate technology as part of the formal teaching toolkit. That process is already happening informally with so many educational videos on YouTube from enthusiasts and educators. But so many technology tools are constantly changing and it will take a strong effort on educators to find the methods that work best. Just like running an experiment in the lab, it will take planning, as well as some trial and error, to get the best results. My personal experience with chemistry and education started about two years ago. I wanted to find a way to reach more people and introduce new and interesting topics in chemistry using existing social networks. My passion for natural product synthesis led me to start a total synthesis Twitter feed. I check all the major organic chemistry journals daily and tweet any completed total synthesis of a natural product that I find. If you are interested in natural product synthesis then you can easily follow the Twitter feed and be up to date. You can also join the conversation by using the hashtag #totalsynthesis. The idea was very simple, but it had yet to be executed. Now in two years there are close to 1000 followers and it serves as an archive of over 400 natural product syntheses in all the major journals. This information would be hard to collect and very laborious using the typical search methods like Google, ACS, SciFinder, etc. It is an idea that can be duplicated for any other topic of interest in science and can be even tried in a formal class setting. Similar ideas include the online Twitter #chemclub by Andrew Bissette. Social media tools are far from the only game in town. Hardware tools have huge potential for application in chemistry education. One example is Google Glass which is basically a head mounted computer with the ability to...

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