CSI: Dognapping at Sandia
Jan13

CSI: Dognapping at Sandia

I spent Monday, January 10, at Sandia’s Advanced Materials Laboratory, in Albuquerque, to witness a unique outreach program that has been an annual weeklong event for the past several years. The lab invites several groups of 4th graders for a chemical magic show that supposedly culminates in a dog doing chemical magic tricks. But just before the dog takes the stage, its handlers discover that it has gone missing. And so a two-hour program of 4th graders just watching staged gee-whiz chemistry becomes a multipronged science-driven activity aimed at figuring out who stole the dog. Here's how the program began: With kids properly garbed for a chemical magic show, AML researcher Bernadette Hernandez-Sanchez welcomes them and introduces the warm-up act of four demonstrators competing for the best magic trick: Sarah Hoppe mixes rainbow water, Diane Dickie performs clock reaction, Alia Saad creates fake snow, and Kari Monroe makes elephant toothpaste. Then must come the main event, but Lucy, the chemical magic dog is missing. AML scientist Tim Boyle suspects that one of the visiting kids kidnapped Lucy. This amateur video captures the program up to this point. Beware: Many parts are jumpy and can make you dizzy. To determine who took Lucy, every boy and girl must give a fingerprint, a footprint, and a voice sample. The data are compared with the fingerprint, voiceprint, and footprint gathered from the crime scene, and all kids are exonerated. But where is Lucy? Tim Boyle asks the kids to investigate the case of the missing dog. But first they must take an oath to be sworn in as junior scientists. The enthusiasm at swearing-in, led by University New Mexico chemistry professor and Sandia scientist Richard Kemp, is ear-piercing: Now the junior scientists are ready to examine the evidence at the crime scene. The lab has four suspects, and the junior scientists must figure out whodunit by examining the evidence at six science stations. Using what they are told about the suspects and what they learn at each station, they associate each piece of evidence to all likely suspects. Eventually, they nail the culprit from the preponderance of evidence correlating with him or her. Here are some scenes from the science stations. At the Powder Lab, they examine the white powder at the crime scene, they prepare a material called Yuck, and they learn about non-Newtonian fluids, which behave like a solid when something hits them with force but like a liquid when handled gently. At the pH Station, they examine the yellow spill at the crime scene, use cabbage juice as pH indicator, and learn about acids and bases. At the Glow...

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