Now on the Sheri Sangji Case: The L.A. District Attorney's Office
Jan13

Now on the Sheri Sangji Case: The L.A. District Attorney's Office

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) last week sent its findings in the investigation of the death of University of California, Los Angeles, chemistry researcher Sheri Sangji to the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office. The DA's office will now review the case and decide whether to file charges against the university or any of its employees. Sangji, a research assistant in the lab of chemistry professor Patrick Harran, died a year ago after being badly burned in a laboratory fire. Cal/OSHA investigated the incident and subsequently fined UCLA $31,875 for laboratory safety violations related to Sangji's death. As is standard practice in the case of a workplace death, Cal/OSHA's Bureau of Investigations reviewed the case to determine whether there was sufficient evidence of criminal violations of the California Labor Code to warrant referring the case to the DA's office. Now, "the prosecutor must evaluate the evidence to determine if a crime has been committed and, if so, if the evidence is sufficient beyond a reasonable doubt to show that the suspect is guilty of the crime," says LA County DA's office spokesperson Sandi Gibbons. "Reviews can take weeks or months, depending on the amount of evidence and if follow-up investigation is needed." Cal/OSHA spokesperson Erika Monterroza told C&EN that the agency had referred Sangji's case to the DA's office. Gibbons confirmed that the DA's office received the evidence from Cal/OSHA and is reviewing it. UCLA, however, "has been assured by Cal/OSHA’s lead investigator, as recently as today, that the investigation is ongoing and that no decision has been made," says UCLA spokesperson Phil Hampton. "UCLA strongly disagrees with any pursuit of criminal charges. The campus believes that Ms. Sangji’s death resulted from a tragic accident involving no willful negligence and was unrelated to the record-keeping, inspections and follow-ups that have been the focus of Cal/OSHA and accounts in the news media." Sangji's sister, Naveen Sangji, has previously said that her family would like the district attorney's office to get involved, because they felt that the Cal/OSHA and university investigations were not thorough enough. "We want to know who was responsible and who failed in their duties to make sure Sheri was safe at work," Naveen said. According to Cal/OSHA policies & procedures, the laws generally considered in cases such as this are Labor Code Sections 6423 and 6425. The sections outline penalties for violations of occupational safety & health standards that include prison time and/or hefty...

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Cal/OSHA Investigates UCLA, Again
Aug27

Cal/OSHA Investigates UCLA, Again

(Post updated at end.) The University of California, Los Angeles, is still under the microscope of state regulators. California Division of Occupational Safety & Health (Cal/OSHA) officials paid the school's chemistry & biochemistry department a surprise visit on Tuesday, Aug. 26. Cal/OSHA spokesperson Erika Monterroza says that the inspection marked the opening of a new investigation into laboratory health & safety at the university, although she refused to comment on the details of the investigation while it is ongoing, including what prompted it. California law gives Cal/OSHA six months to complete investigations, although the agency usually takes 3-4 months, Monterroza says. Rita Kern, a staff research associate in UCLA's medical school, is a member of the University Professional and Technical Employees union's health & safety committee and accompanied the three Cal/OSHA inspectors. The inspectors did not reveal what prompted their visit, she says. The group had intended to inspect multiple labs in the chemistry & biochemistry department, Kern says, but because of time constraints looked only at the labs of Patrick Harran, a UCLA chemistry professor and the supervisor of Sheharbano (Sheri) Sangji, a staff research associate who died earlier this year from burns sustained in a fire in Harran's lab. Harran was not present for the inspection, Kern says. The inspectors plan to return to look at the labs of other faculty members, Kern says. The inspectors scrutinized general housekeeping in the labs, whether people were wearing appropriate personal protective equipment, and whether workers were informed about the hazards of the chemicals in the labs, Kern says. She says that the inspection was more educational than adversarial, with the Cal/OSHA personnel making it clear that they were there to look out for the well-being of the lab workers. At the exit conference, the inspectors highlighted the need to ensure proper labeling of chemicals and put away items that are not in use, as well as that lab workers should be better informed about what they're working with and the hazards involved, Kern says. One of the inspectors noted that what they had seen that day was not significantly different from what they have generally observed at other universities, Kern says. "UCLA will review Cal/OSHA's finding and, where appropriate and possible, address them immediately, consistent with UCLA's commitment to ensuring the safest possible operation of all campus labs," says UCLA spokesperson Phil Hampton. It remains unclear what prompted the inspection. According to Cal/OSHA's User's Guide (pdf), a surprise inspection could be triggered by a formal complaint made by an employee or an employee representative such as an attorney or a union or health & safety professional. "Formal complaints are...

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