DEA already admits defeat on synthetic marijuana ban?
Mar02

DEA already admits defeat on synthetic marijuana ban?

For those following our most persistent story of the last year or so, you've already heard that the US Drug Enforcement Administration declared as controlled substances five synthetic cannabimimetics present in "herbal incense" products such as K2 Spice, Mr. Nice Guy, and Blaze. These compounds include JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47,497, and cannabicyclohexanol. With respect to our chemistry audience here, I discussed on New Year's Eve how the DEA has authority to also regulate "analogues" [sic] of compounds that have been assigned to Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. This amendment to the act gives the DEA latitude to prosecute the sale, use, and possession of chemical analogs or compounds pharmacologically-similar to those explicitly listed as controlled substances. What authority decides what's an analog or not is still a mystery to me and was the subject of that post. In anticipation of yesterday's final rule, synthetic marijuana marketers had already been reformulating their products with compounds not named in this rule but existing among the portfolio of retired Clemson University organic chemist, John W. Huffman - namesake of the JWH compounds. (The compound most commonly cited by readers and commenters at my blogs is JWH-250.). As I understood the DEA's authority, sale of these products containing apparently still-legal compounds could still potentially be prosecuted. Well, in a story from Minnesota Public Radio, a DEA spokesperson is already apparently admitting defeat in response to retailers who are stocking products free of the five named compounds: [Last Place On Earth shop owner Jim] Carlson said that with about 210 similar chemicals available, the manufacturers will try to keep one step ahead of the government "Unfortunately he is correct," said Barbara Carreno, a DEA spokeswoman in Washington, who confirmed Tuesday that many suppliers are offering retailers products with new chemicals. "There are many of these substances and we chose five common ones because we don't have the resources to study all of them." Hmmm. Really? As we've also discussed here, several states including North Carolina have put forth legislation that exhaustively bans potentially hundreds of analogs of synthetic cannabimimetics. While the DEA limited their rule to five, it seems odd to me that they are saying, "Oh well," when they seem to have the authority to apply the rule to related compounds. After all of the quibbling and delay since the DEA first announced its intention to enact this rule last November, is anyone else confused by this throwing up of...

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Strong chemistry in NC bills banning legal highs
Feb12

Strong chemistry in NC bills banning legal highs

On Wednesday, two bills passed unanimously in the North Carolina State Senate that would outlaw synthetic cannabimimetics and mephedrone. These compounds are currently sold as Spice incense (e.g., K2, Black Mamba) or "bath salts" (e.g., Ivory Wave), respectively. (Many thanks to WRAL-TV Capitol Bureau Chief Laura Leslie and fellow blogger DrugMonkey for alerting me to these bills via Twitter.). Legislatively, similar bills have been passed and laws enacted in states and municipalities around the US while a proposed scheduling rule by the federal drug agency, the DEA, languishes in an administrative and legal morass. The synthetic marijuana bill, House Bill 12 (Senate 9) and the mephedrone bill, House Bill 13 (Senate 7), were originally both put forth in the NC House by co-sponsors led by Representative George Cleveland (R, NC-14) of Jacksonville, North Carolina, home to the US Marine base Camp Lejeune. Cleveland himself is a retired, 25-year US Marine. The US military has been far ahead of other state and federal agencies in prohibiting use of these chemicals and associated products. But for readers of this blog, the part of the NC bills that most impressed me was the exhaustive and near-encyclopedia listing of chemicals to be outlawed under the bills. For example, while the DEA has proposed to only regulate five compounds (and implied prohibition of structural analogs), take a gander at this list: The following controlled substances are included in this schedule: (6) Synthetic cannabinoids. – Any material, compound, mixture, or preparation that contains any quantity of the following substances, their salts, isomers (whether optical, positional, or geometric), homologues, and salts of isomers and homologues, unless specifically excepted, whenever the existence of these salts, isomers, homologues, and salts of isomers and homologues is possible within the specific chemical designation: a. Naphthoylindoles. Any compound containing a 3‑(1‑naphthoyl)indole structure with substitution at the nitrogen atom of the indole ring by an alkyl, haloalkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkylmethyl, cycloalkylethyl, 1‑(N‑methyl‑2‑piperidinyl)methyl, or 2‑(4‑morpholinyl)ethyl group, whether or not further substituted in the indole ring to any extent and whether or not substituted in the naphthyl ring to any extent. Some trade or other names: JWH‑015, JWH‑018, JWH‑019, JWH‑073, JWH‑081, JWH‑122, JWH‑200, JWH‑210, JWH‑398, AM‑2201, WIN 55‑212. b. Naphthylmethylindoles. Any compound containing a 1H‑indol‑3‑yl‑(1‑naphthyl)methane structure with substitution at the nitrogen atom of the indole ring by an alkyl, haloalkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkylmethyl, cycloalkylethyl, 1‑(N‑methyl‑2‑piperidinyl)methyl, or 2‑(4‑morpholinyl)ethyl group, whether or not further substituted in the indole ring to any extent and whether or not substituted in the naphthyl ring to any extent. c. Naphthoylpyrroles. Any compound containing a 3‑(1‑naphthoyl)pyrrole structure with substitution at the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole ring by an alkyl, haloalkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkylmethyl, cycloalkylethyl,...

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