“Top Chemistry Moments of 2013” Google Hangout #topchem 1/9 3PM Eastern
Jan06

“Top Chemistry Moments of 2013” Google Hangout #topchem 1/9 3PM Eastern

UPDATE 1/10/14: View the archived webcast here: Everyone loves a good year-end roundup. Chemists are no exception. But condensing a year's worth of discoveries into a neat little "top 10" package is bound to stir up some discussion. What goes on the list? Who got left out? We hope you readers will help hash out these questions at C&EN's second Google Hangout, "Top Chemistry Moments of 2013". It's on Thursday, January 9, at 3PM Eastern US time. For those new to Google Hangouts, they are video chats broadcast live on the web. You can watch from Google Plus or YouTube. After the chat is finished it is archived on YouTube for anyone to view. Join the Hangout here. Carmen Drahl and Lauren Wolf will speak with Laura Howes and Ashutosh Jogalekar about the people and the research that made chemistry news in 2013, and talk about what to watch in 2014. Follow the conversation, and ask questions to the speakers on Twitter using the hashtag #topchem. Laura Howes is Editor of Science in School, the European journal for science teachers that highlights cutting-edge research and teaching. She is a former science correspondent for Chemistry World magazine. Follow her on Twitter at @L_Howes. Ash Jogalekar does molecular modeling at Ensemble Therapeutics, a biotech startup in Cambridge, MA focused on using the specific base-pairing properties of DNA to synthesize novel macrocycle drugs. Ash has been blogging at "The Curious Wavefunction" for about eight years and at Scientific American Blogs since 2012. His main interests are in the history of chemistry, in understanding the relationship between chemical models and reality, and in studying chemistry as a tool-driven rather than an idea-driven revolution. Follow him on Twitter @curiouswavefn. Lauren Wolf is an associate editor at Chemical & Engineering News. Follow her on Twitter @laurenkwolf. Carmen Drahl is a senior editor at Chemical & Engineering News. Follow her on Twitter...

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Join “Countdown to the Chemistry Nobel!” Google Hangout #chemnobel – UPDATED
Oct02

Join “Countdown to the Chemistry Nobel!” Google Hangout #chemnobel – UPDATED

Who's going to take home the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry? Will chemistry's most coveted honor go to (GASP!) a biologist? Is there any point to all this pre-Nobel speculation? Maybe not, but there's no denying chemists enjoy taking part in the conversation. That's why we hope readers will tune in to C&EN's first Google Hangout, "Countdown to the Chemistry Nobel!" this Thursday, October 3, at 3PM Eastern US time. For those new to Google Hangouts, they are video chats broadcast live on the web. You can watch from Google Plus or YouTube. After the chat is finished it is archived on YouTube for anyone to view. Join the Hangout here. Carmen Drahl and Lauren Wolf will speak with Neil Withers and Paul Bracher about the runup to this year's prize, which will be announced Wednesday, October 9. What predictions are out there already and how reliable are they? Why did so few people predict that Dan Shechtman would win the Nobel Prize for quasicrystals? Watch for a discussion about these and other questions. Follow the conversation, and ask questions to the speakers on Twitter using the hashtag #chemnobel. UPDATE 10/2: I'm excited to announce another guest has joined the hangout: Simon Frantz. Simon Frantz is Editor of BBC Future, and a former senior editor of Nobelprize.org. Follow him on Twitter @simon_frantz Neil Withers is Features Editor for Chemistry World magazine. Follow him on Twitter @neilwithers Paul Bracher blogs at Chembark, and is Assistant Professor of Chemistry at St. Louis University. Follow him on Twitter @Chembark Carmen Drahl is a senior editor at Chemical & Engineering News. Follow her on Twitter @carmendrahl Lauren Wolf is an associate editor at Chemical & Engineering News. Follow her on Twitter...

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Celebrating 90 Years of Chemistry News Coverage
Sep10

Celebrating 90 Years of Chemistry News Coverage

With this week's issue, C&EN celebrates its 90th anniversary. Even if I do say so myself, we've put out a pretty terrific edition. The bulk of our coverage this week is stories on nine major ways chemistry has had a profound effect on our world over the previous nine decades. (Thanks to Ash over at The Curious Wavefunction for his thoughts on the chemical bond and chemistry as the central science in response to this editorial package.) But we've put together a lot more than the main stories to celebrate this milestone. There's a supplemental timeline for starters. We've also compiled a list of readers' favorite articles and devoted a whole page to an inebriating Newscripts. Here on the network, Beth Halford will be celebrating Newscripts' 70th anniversary throughout the week with batches of Department of Obscure Information gems. We even have a crossword puzzle (I know this thrills some of you immensely)! And if you hadn't noticed the entries in the weekly roundups, let me draw your attention now to The Watch Glass tumblr, where former C&EN intern Deirdre Lockwood has been taking us on a random and fascinating walk through C&EN's archives. Obviously, not only has the science changed over the past nine decades, but how we share the news with you has as well. This anniversary issue is the first one in which online components were part of the planning process from the very beginning. I feel fortunate to be part of a publication eager to explore the opportunities digital platforms--blogs, social media, videos, interactive graphics, you name it--are creating for communicating news of the chemical world. I leave you not with a (real) cupcake or a toast, but with a charming anecdote Sarah Everts uncovered while working on her piece about the history of structural biology: Talk to any old-school structural biologist--I mean the folks who solved protein structures in the 50s, 60s and 70s when uncovering the 3D topology of a small enzyme might take years or decades--and they'll wax nostalgically about the Alps. As I was working on this week's article about the history of structural biology, nearly everyone I interviewed mentioned a series of conferences that took place in the Austrian Alps, first in Hirschegg and then Alpbach. Max Perutz, who solved the structure of hemoglobin after a 22-year effort, and his fellow Austrian crystallographer in Munich named Walter Hoppe began organizing these Alpen conferences in the late 60s. The first one was “a turning point in the history of the field,” says Michael Rossmann, now at Purdue who initially worked with Perutz on hemoglobin. “Some people had thought that myoglobin and hemoglobin were...

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C&EN Picks Videos: ACS Indianapolis Meeting #ACSIndy
Aug20

C&EN Picks Videos: ACS Indianapolis Meeting #ACSIndy

How can chemists protect bees and other pollinators from harmful pesticides? Why is a company that makes video game graphics processors sponsoring an ACS meeting competition? The answers to these questions and more are in this round of C&EN Picks, our video highlights of newsworthy ACS National Meeting sessions. See you in Indianapolis on September 8! UPDATE 9/9/13: It's come to our attention that in Sunday's video, the photos for Daniel Kittle and Bret Huff were switched. We'd like to apologize to them and to you for the oversight, and to thank Vicky Kittle and Milea Kammer, who brought this to our attention on...

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Sarah Everts talks Artful Science at conservation meeting, Jyllian Kemsley moderated #chemsafety panel
May29

Sarah Everts talks Artful Science at conservation meeting, Jyllian Kemsley moderated #chemsafety panel

We interrupt our regular overlord schedule for some self-promotion. This Saturday, Sarah Everts will speak at the American Institute for Conservation meeting in Indianapolis. You might've gleaned her location from her Twitter feed. Her talk will be during the Research and Technical Studies luncheon, and is entitled 'Artful Science: Quirky Trends and Fascinating Discoveries in Cultural Heritage Research, from a Journalist’s Perspective'. Sarah is the second CENtral Science blogger in as many weeks to be on the conference circuit. On May 19, Jyllian Kemsley moderated a panel at the Council for Chemical Research annual meeting. The panel billed itself as an update on the pilot safety collaborations Dow Chemical has undertaken with the University of Minnesota, Penn State University, and the University of California, Santa Barbara. Jyllian buried that nugget of self-promotion at the bottom of one of her always-thorough posts. And she covered the May 19th announcement of Dow's new safety...

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Talking about science online at #sciodc
Apr29

Talking about science online at #sciodc

This Wednesday, May 1, ScienceOnlineDC will be holding its inaugural event. ScienceOnlineDC is one of several local satellites of ScienceOnline, a nonprofit organization that facilitates conversations, community, and collaborations at the intersection of science and the Web. Our goal is to bring together science journalists, bloggers, federal and private research scientists, policymakers, and other science enthusiasts in the DC metro area for dynamic discussions about how science is carried out and communicated online. My co-organizers are Geoffrey Hunt of the American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow Jamie Vernon, and Hannah Waters of the Smithsonian Institution. Our first event will focus on federal agencies' social media policies - how does government transparency influence the social media activities of scientists and communications staff? Here's the panelist lineup: Jamie Vernon, moderator Gretchen Goldman, analyst, Union of Concerned Scientists (check out her post about Wednesday's event) Megan McVey, communications coordinator, United States Global Change Research Program Sarah Dewitt, communications officer, NASA, Office of the Chief Scientist John Ohab, public affairs specialist, Naval Research Laboratory One of the hallmarks of ScienceOnline events is the unconference format. Sure, we've rounded up some experts to put in the front of the room, but most of the conversation will be driven by the attendees, both in person and online. Even if you can't be there in person, chime in via the livestream and twitter (#sciodc). Should be a great discussion. Of course, you may be wondering why I'm pitching this event to an audience of chemists, most of whom are not in the DC area. I'll tell you why. Because it's important for chemists to be involved in these conversations. Because many of you are already having such conversations on twitter and each other's blogs. And some of those conversations include pondering who could be the chemist version of Neil deGrasse Tyson. But chemistry doesn't need one deGrasse Tyson; it needs several. So, let's move those discussions out of the chemistry inner circle and into Science, writ large. Chemistry is the central science, after all. And you can start by attending any gathering with other people in your community who are interested in how science is communicated. As I said earlier, ScienceOnlineDC is only one of several satellites. Others with regular events include Seattle, Vancouver, and the Bay Area. There are SpotOn events in London and New York. Attend a local #SciTweetUp or Science Cafe. Or participate in the livestreams and twitter conversations that often accompany these events. And if you are in DC on Wednesday, c'mon by. We'd love to have you. UPDATE, 5/6: Doh! How could I leave out...

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