Layoffs – Your Stories

Have you or someone close to you been laid off in the chemical or pharma fields? We are looking for readers to share their experiences for inclusion in upcoming stories. We are seeking personal stories of those laid off, the psychological and financial impacts, severance issues, and ideas for helping others to make it through tough times. Confidentiality is assured; C&EN will not reveal your identity unless you consent. Please contact Assistant Managing Editor Linda Raber at L_Raber@acs.org or linda.raber@gmail.com; phone (202) 872-4506.

Author: Rachel Pepling

Share This Post On

4 Comments

  1. I work for a CRO (Contract Research Organization) that does animal testing for the pharmaceutical industry. Our business largely depends on other companies- pharma big and small to contract us to do their in vivo work ranging from toxicological to ADME. With the uncertainty in the market, a lot of venture capital money is drying up, meaning small, upstart pharma doesn’t have the money to do these sort of tests. This trickles down to CROs meaning we have had to do a significant amount of laying off (Including our department which lost techs, scientists and study directors) and have had to scale back our ambitious expansion plans. 2007 was our biggest year yet and it looks like 2008 will be our worst.

  2. This is so sad. I guess this means you should show up for work if you get a job offer.

  3. Gee, think the H1B visa program has anything to do with the fact that so many skilled Americans are being thrown out of work right now?

    Think if there was no H1B visa program, more people would still be working?

    We must give these corporations the right to hire such slave labor though right?

    No wonder Americans have no interest in studying science and engineering any more…..

  4. I work for a CRO, and we have people working here for companies which are layingoff people. I bet, those companies trust (or see more output) in CRO’s than their own employees. In this bad economy, every one want to make as much as possible with the little money they can afford.