Friday chemical safety round up

Cletus Welch, a senior research chemist for the chemical division of PPG Industries, finds that glassware in his lab makes an unusual chess set. During a break in his research on chlorine-oxygen compounds at PPG's Barberton, Ohio, labs, Cletus set up a game using the pieces as chessmen. C&EN July 28, 1969, via The Watch Glass

Cletus Welch, a senior research chemist for the chemical division of PPG Industries, finds that glassware in his lab makes an unusual chess set. During a break in his research on chlorine-oxygen compounds at PPG’s Barberton, Ohio, labs, Cletus set up a game using the pieces as chessmen. C&EN July 28, 1969, via The Watch Glass

If y’all aren’t following The Watch Glass, C&EN’s “random walk” through 90 years of C&EN curated by Deirdre Lockwood, go check it out! Personally, I have a love/hate relationship with our archives, because I inevitably get sucked in and lose a couple of hours to reading.

Chemical health and safety news from the past (rather quiet) week:

  • Not chemistry, but good insight into the problems with workplace injury numbers: Counting work-related amputations. Of all the workplace injuries to be recorded, you’d think this would be a relatively easy one to get right. There’s not much gray area in amputation.
  • On the (weak) links between environmental contaminants and cancer: Cancer cluster or chance?
  • Insecurity about chemical plants: Federal officials defend backlogged risk assessment program.

Fires and explosions:

Leaks, spills, and other exposures:

Not covered (usually): meth labs; ammonia leaks; incidents involving floor sealants, cleaning solutions, or pool chemicals; transportation spills; things that happen at recycling centers (dispose of your waste properly, people!); and fires from oil, natural gas, or other fuels.

Author: Jyllian Kemsley

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2 Comments

  1. The dechlorinating agent used in Georgia was probably sodium thiosulfate.
    OCl – + 2 S2O3 2- + H2O -> Cl – + S4O6 2- + 2 OH -
    Sodium thiosulfate is specified as a dechlorinating agent in many EPA methods.