Liveblogging First-Time Disclosures of Drug Structures from #ACSNOLA
Apr04

Liveblogging First-Time Disclosures of Drug Structures from #ACSNOLA

Bookmark this page now, folks. On Wednesday, April 10, I will be here, liveblogging the public debut of five drug candidates’ structures. The “First Time Disclosures” Session at the ACS National Meeting in New Orleans runs from 2PM-4:55PM Central time. I am not able to conjure up a permalink to the session program, so here’s a screengrab instead. 1:20PM I’m in hall R02, where the session’s set to begin in about 40 minutes. Found a seat with a power outlet nearby, so I’m good to go! 2:29PM BMS-906024 Company: Bristol-Myers Squibb Meant to treat: cancers including breast, lung, colon, and leukemia Mode of action: pan-Notch inhibitor Medicinal chemistry tidbit: The BMS team used an oxidative enolate heterocoupling en route to the candidate– a procedure from Phil Baran’s lab at Scripps Research Institute. JACS 130, 11546 Status in the pipeline: Phase I Relevant documents: WO 2012/129353 3:02PM LGX818 Company: Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research and Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation Meant to treat: melanoma with a specific mutation in B-RAF kinase: V600E Mode of action: selective mutant B-RAF kinase inhibitor Status in the pipeline: Phase Ib/II Relevant documents: WO 2011/023773 ; WO 2011/025927 3:47PM AZD5423 Company: AstraZeneca Meant to treat: respiratory diseases, in particular chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Mode of action: non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor modulators Medicinal chemistry tidbit: This compound originated in part from a collaboration with Bayer Pharma. Status in the pipeline: Phase II Relevant documents: WO 2011/061527 ; WO 2010/008341 ; WO 2009/142568 4:17PM Birinapant (formerly known as TL32711) Company: TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals Meant to treat: cancer Mode of action: blocks the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins to reinstate cancer cell death Status in the pipeline: Phase II Relevant documents: US 8,283,372 5:00PM MGL-3196 (previously VIA-3196) Company: Madrigal Pharmaceuticals, acquired from VIA Pharmaceuticals, licensed from Roche Meant to treat: high cholesterol/high triglycerides Mode of action: mimics thyroid hormone, targeted to thyroid hormone receptor beta in the liver Medicinal chemistry tidbit: this molecule was discovered at Roche’s now-shuttered Nutley site. Status in the pipeline: completed Phase I trials Relevant documents: WO 2007/009913 ; WO 2009/037172 And that’s it, folks! Watch the April 22nd issue of C&EN for more on this...

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Pharma & Biotech Job Cuts Mount in 2012

For those keeping track, yesterday’s layoffs at AstraZeneca add to an already substantial list of cuts in the pharma and biotech industries since the beginning of the year. By our tally, nearly 13,000 job cuts, many in R&D, have been announced so far–and we’re barely into February. Here’s where we’re at (and do let us know if we’ve missed any): –AstraZeneca is chopping 7,300 jobs, including 2,200 R&D positions, by 2014. Neuroscience research is being revamped and focused on external partnerships; the company’s Montreal R&D site will be shuttered, and research activities ended at its Södertälje site in Sweden. –Genzyme gave the pink slip to an unspecified number of R&D scientists this week. The layoffs come as Sanofi integrates its big biotech acquisition. –Alnylam is trimming 61 jobs, or 33% of its workforce, in order to save roughly $20 million this year. –BioSante Pharmaceuticals is shedding 25% of its staff, or 21 employees and contractors, after disappointing Phase III results for its female sexual dysfunction treatment LibiGel. –Takeda is axing 2,800 jobs, or 9% of its workforce, following its acquisition of Swiss drugmaker Nycomed. The bulk of the layoffs, which cut across R&D, commercial, operations, and administrative positions, will occur in Europe. –Novartis unveiled plans to shed some 1,960 positions in the U.S. as it braces for generic competition for Diovan, a blood pressure medicine that brought in more than $6 billion in 2010, and an expected drop in demand for its renin inhibitor Rasilez following questions about the drug’s safety. –Human Genome Sciences said it would cut 150 jobs, or about 14% of its workforce, in a move that affects manufacturing, R&D, and administrative activities. –Xoma is shedding 84 workers, or 34% of its staff, as it shifts to outsourcing late-stage and commercial manufacturing, as well as some research. –SkyePharma is cutting 20% of the 101 employees at its site in Muttenz, Switzerland. –Sanofi plans to layoff 100 workers at its Monteal site as part of an overhaul of its Canadian operations. –J&J will trim 126 workers as it closes its Monreal R&D...

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AstraZeneca to Shed 2,200 R&D Jobs

AstraZeneca wielded a heavy ax to its workforce today as it prepares for tougher times ahead. The British-Swedish drugmaker is chopping 7,300 jobs, including 2,200 R&D positions, in hopes of achieving $1.6 billion in annual cost savings by 2014. This is the third round of major cutbacks at AstraZeneca. In 2010, the company announced plans to slash 8,000 jobs over four years, a move that added to the elimination of 15,000 jobs between 2007 and 2009. This specific round girds against an onslaught of generic competition for key products and accounts for several disappointments in the company’s late-stage pipeline. In the coming months, the company will lose patent protection in various markets for the anti-psychotic Seroquel IR, the anti-cholesterol drug Crestor, and the blood thinner Atacand. Meanwhile, AstraZeneca’s late-stage pipeline has faltered. The recent setbacks (adding to earlier ones) include ending development of the PARP inhibitor olaparib, which prompted it to take a $285 million charge; a failed Phase III trial for the antidepressant TC-5214; and a thumbs down from FDA last month for dapagliflozin, a Type II diabetes drug being developed with Bristol-Myers Squibb. R&D has taken a heavy hit in each round of cuts. During the Q&A session following AstraZeneca’s earnings presentation, one analyst said his back of the envelope calculations suggest the company will have shed 7,600 R&D jobs between 2006 and 2014. Based on comments by AstraZeneca’s R&D chief Martin Mackay, small molecule research has born the brunt of those cuts. He noted that headcount in biologics research has grown, and pointed out that biologics now account for 40% of the company’s early-stage pipeline (candidates in studies earlier than Phase II), up from 15-20% in recent years. The latest R&D revamp will be primarily focused on AstraZeneca’s neuroscience activities, where the risk of investment is seen as particularly high. “It’s a really tough area,” Mackay said.  “The industry hasn’t produced enough and we haven’t produced enough.” The challenge was highlighted in November, when TC-5214, an anti-depressant being developed by Targacept and AstraZeneca, failed to show benefit in a Phase III trial. The bad news came as a surprise, as TC-5214 had demonstrated strong efficacy in smaller trials. Three other Phase III trials are underway, but analysts are skeptical that the program can be salvaged. “Prospects appear grim,” Leerink Swann analyst Joshua Schimmer said in a note last month. AstraZeneca is creating a small team of 40 to 50 scientists that will work with external partners in academia and industry to discover and develop neuroscience drugs. The adoption of this new strategy means that the company’s Montreal R&D facility will be shuttered, and it will end R&D at its Södertälje site in Sweden....

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Novartis’s Afinitor helps Pfizer’s Aromasin to Delay Breast Cancer
Sep27

Novartis’s Afinitor helps Pfizer’s Aromasin to Delay Breast Cancer

Looks like Afinitor (everolimus), a drug marketed by Novartis for various cancers, may soon have a new indication. Already approved for a variety of diseases – kidney cancer, pancreatic tumors, and organ rejection prevention – Afinitor shows new promise for breast cancer patients. Clinical data released Monday demonstrate marked improvement for hormone-resistant breast cancer patients when Afinitor, an mTOR inhibitor, is used in combination with the aromatase inhibitor Aromasin (exemestane). Patients receiving both drugs delayed disease progression an average of 7 months, versus 3 months for Aromasin alone. Standard therapy for breast cancer includes treatment with estrogen receptor antagonists, such as Aromasin and tamoxifen, which bind in the estrogen receptor pocket of cancer cells, slowing proliferation (see the excellent NCI website for more information on breast cancer treatment). Aromasin itself has a very similar structure to estrone (a natural body hormone that binds to estrogen receptors) except that it irreversibly modifies the receptor pocket upon binding, making Aromasin a so-called “covalent” or “suicide” inhibitor (see Lila Guterman’s article from Sept. 5, 2011 issue of C&EN for more on drugs that bind for keeps). Like Aromasin, Afinitor follows the trend of being structurally related to a natural binder of a key cancer target protein. mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), the protein target of Afinitor and related macrolides, was first discovered through binding studies using rapamycin, a polyketide natural product found in a soil bacterium from Easter Island (its Polynesian name is Rapa Nui, hence, rapamycin). Rapamycin also goes by the generic name sirolimus, of which so many analogues have been prepared that all go by the catch-all “limus drugs.” The attachment of a hydroxyethyl (CH2CH2OH) tail to rapamycin produces everolimus, which compared to sirolimus demonstrates better pharmacokinetic properties, including higher bioavailability (greater proportion of drug reaching target sites) and a shorter plasma half-life (meaning the drug doesn’t stick around as long, which can help curb toxicity or other side effects). Note: Please see Sally Church’s post on Pharma Strategy Blog for more info on mTOR pathway biology and coverage of ECCO 2011 conference information regarding...

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Is Vernalis’ Hsp90 Destined to Be a Blockbuster?

Vernalis shares shot up today after Novartis gave a shout out to AUY922, which blocks a molecular chaperone called Hsp90, in a discussion of its second-quarter results. The Swiss pharma major identified AUY922 in a list of potential blockbusters, a distinction that may seem ambitious to those who have been watching compound after compound targeting Hsp90, which helps stabilize stressed-out proteins, crash and burn. So what makes the Vernalis drug so interesting? We took a look at the field back in 2007, and at the time it was clear the Vernalis compound differed from most of the other drugs in or poised to enter clinical studies. The first and second-generation Hsp90 inhibitors were all based on geldanamycin, an antibiotic found in soil microorganisms. On its own, the natural product is a poor drug candidate—a quinine moiety renders it highly reactive and highly insoluble. Much of the early discovery work was focused on engineering out those issues, leading to drug candidates from Kosan Bioscience (bought by Bristol-Myers Squibb in 2008, work on the Hsp90 drug, however, seems dead in the water), Conforma Therapeutics (bought by Biogen Idec in 2006, after which the Hsp90 compound was put on the backburner), and Infinity Pharmaceuticals. But, as we wrote, Vernalis sidestepped geldanamycin altogether: Vernalis deployed fragment-based drug discovery technology to find low-molecular-weight compounds with a weak binding affinity for Hsp90. Guided by X-ray crystal structures of prospective compounds bound to Hsp90, company researchers optimized the compounds into leads. The end result is a range of drugs that do not all fall under the geldanamycin umbrella. That’s the structure piece, but another piece of the puzzle is that researchers appear to be figuring out how best to use these compounds. On their own, Hsp90 inhibitors have shown limited to no therapeutic benefit. “It is abundantly clear that with rare exceptions we did not see a lot of single agent activity” with Hsp90 inhibitors,  Julian Adams, president of R&D at Infinity, told me last month at the ASCO annual meeting. The lack of activity might have been predicted, he adds, given that it was known that blocking Hsp90 only activated another protein-folding chaperone called Hsp70. Indeed, evidence is emerging that Hsp90 inhibitors could find use in combinations with other targeted agents and for specific patient populations. Infinity did a deep dive into the data gathered from a Phase I trial combining Infinity’s lead Hsp90 inhibitor retaspimycin and Taxotere in lung cancer patients. The result: signs of strong activity in people with the ALK mutation (the target of Pfizer’s lung cancer drug crizotinib), in heavy smokers, and in people who carried the normal KRas gene. There...

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