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Posts Tagged → layoffs

AstraZeneca to Shed 2,200 R&D Jobs

AstraZeneca wielded a heavy ax to its workforce today as it prepares for tougher times ahead. The British-Swedish drugmaker is chopping 7,300 jobs, including 2,200 R&D positions, in hopes of achieving $1.6 billion in annual cost savings by 2014.

This is the third round of major cutbacks at AstraZeneca. In 2010, the company announced plans to slash 8,000 jobs over four years, a move that added to the elimination of 15,000 jobs between 2007 and 2009. This specific round girds against an onslaught of generic competition for key products and accounts for several disappointments in the company’s late-stage pipeline. In the coming months, the company will lose patent protection in various markets for the anti-psychotic Seroquel IR, the anti-cholesterol drug Crestor, and the blood thinner Atacand. Meanwhile, AstraZeneca’s late-stage pipeline has faltered. The recent setbacks (adding to earlier ones) include ending development of the PARP inhibitor olaparib, which prompted it to take a $285 million charge; a failed Phase III trial for the antidepressant TC-5214; and a thumbs down from FDA last month for dapagliflozin, a Type II diabetes drug being developed with Bristol-Myers Squibb.

R&D has taken a heavy hit in each round of cuts. During the Q&A session following AstraZeneca’s earnings presentation, one analyst said his back of the envelope calculations suggest the company will have shed 7,600 R&D jobs between 2006 and 2014. Based on comments by AstraZeneca’s R&D chief Martin Mackay, small molecule research has born the brunt of those cuts. He noted that headcount in biologics research has grown, and pointed out that biologics now account for 40% of the company’s early-stage pipeline (candidates in studies earlier than Phase II), up from 15-20% in recent years.

The latest R&D revamp will be primarily focused on AstraZeneca’s neuroscience activities, where the risk of investment is seen as particularly high. “It’s a really tough area,” Mackay said.  “The industry hasn’t produced enough and we haven’t produced enough.”

The challenge was highlighted in November, when TC-5214, an anti-depressant being developed by Targacept and AstraZeneca, failed to show benefit in a Phase III trial. The bad news came as a surprise, as TC-5214 had demonstrated strong efficacy in smaller trials. Three other Phase III trials are underway, but analysts are skeptical that the program can be salvaged. “Prospects appear grim,” Leerink Swann analyst Joshua Schimmer said in a note last month.

AstraZeneca is creating a small team of 40 to 50 scientists that will work with external partners in academia and industry to discover and develop neuroscience drugs. The adoption of this new strategy means that the company’s Montreal R&D facility will be shuttered, and it will end R&D at its Södertälje site in Sweden.

AstraZeneca’s overhaul of its neuroscience activities is the latest in what appears to be a big pharma exodus from internal central nervous system R&D. In December, Novartis said it would close its neuroscience research facility in Basel, Switzerland, and GlaxoSmithKline two years ago decided to end research in certain central nervous system areas, such as depression and pain.

Genzyme R&D Layoffs Today

The other shoe has dropped at Genzyme, which last year was acquired by Sanofi, but had yet to experience the kind of major research restructuring that typically accompanies the integration of two pharma companies. Today, Genzyme scientists were told whether their job was being shed or moved. Here’s an excerpt from the official statement:

As part of the integration process between Sanofi and Genzyme, R&D activities were reviewed and assessed. On January 31, 2012, the results of the review of U.S. R&D Genzyme activities were announced, including synergies that unfortunately make some positions redundant. All US R&D Genzyme employees impacted by the integration received notice regarding whether their position would be relocated or eliminated.

The job cuts are separate from the latest round of R&D layoffs at Sanofi. As readers might recall, Sanofi announced last November that it was closing its Bridgewater R&D site, and move discovery and early development activities to Boston. A Sanofi spokesperson tells the Haystack that despite today’s cuts at Genzyme, the company is committed to its presence in Massachusetts, and to maintaining a stable level of jobs there. While R&D is falling under the axe, the company is hiring in manufacturing and multiple sclerosis, she says.

The company has not provided details on how many R&D scientists will be shed, but once more information comes to light, we’ll update readers.

Scientists On The Move

I like taking the time to read the fine print in journal articles. When I first read the antibiotic work I posted about yesterday, I noticed that a few of the authors on the paper had little crosses next to their names. If you go to said fine print, you will find that they are no longer at GSK, but are located elsewhere. I’m no Chemjobber or Electron Pusher, but I try to pay attention to researchers’ moves.

Drake S. Eggleston, Fabrice Gorrec, Earl W. May & Alexandre Wohlkonig
Present addresses: Innovalyst, 1000 Centre Green Way, Suite 200, Cary, North Carolina 27513, USA (D.S.E.); MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 0QH, UK (F.G.); OSI Pharmaceuticals, 1 Bioscience Park Drive, Farmingdale, New York 11735, USA (E.W.M.); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, VIB Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium (A.W.).