Isis Outlines Cancer Drug Strategy

Isis Pharmaceuticals is returning to its roots. The company held an investor call today to highlight its cancer pipeline, which has taken second fiddle in recent years to its cardiovascular pipeline, in particular the cholesterol drug mipomersen. Isis’ CEO Stanley Crooke appears confident that the technology has progressed enough and its clinical strategy has evolved to ensure a better path forward for antisense in cancer. Cancer has...

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Beyond siRNA: Alnylam’s Other Biotherapeutics Ambitions

Alnylam gave a first peek today inside its new biotherapeutics manufacturing business, launched in November. So far, it looks kind of intriguing. Though best known for as a leader in the race to turn siRNA into viable therapeutics, the company has embarked on a bit of a side project: using siRNA to improve the yield of biologics manufacturing process. As you’ve probably read, therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies ain’t...

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Just A Quick Note

Posting might be irregular here for the next day or two, as Lisa and I are in the midst of C&E News’s advisory board meeting. In the meantime, I’ll leave you with a few links of interest. Derek Lowe discusses Two Bad Ideas for remedying the pharma employment situation via @EricMilgram on Twitter, Pfizer warns of 50 layoffs in Durham, North Carolina Silence Therapeutics extends by one year its deal with AstraZeneca to...

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Where Graphene Meets Antisense

In today’s issue we covered a new way to deliver short stretches of DNA into cells- with graphene, the nanoscale material that’s made from sheets of carbon just one atom thick. There’s been an explosion of papers on this versatile stuff, since it has potential applications in computing, digital displays and more. This is very early-stage work, but we at the Haystack were intrigued by the material’s talent for...

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GSK and Isis in Antisense Deal

Is antisense making a comeback? Isis Pharmaceuticals this morning announced a deal with GlaxoSmithKline worth up to $1.5 billion to develop drugs to treat rare and infectious diseases. Here’s how the math breaks down: Isis gets $35 million upfront, and on average $20 million for every program it brings into Phase II trials. At that point, GSK can exercise an option to license the compound and take on all the further development costs....

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