Novartis’s Afinitor helps Pfizer’s Aromasin to Delay Breast Cancer
Sep27

Novartis’s Afinitor helps Pfizer’s Aromasin to Delay Breast Cancer

Looks like Afinitor (everolimus), a drug marketed by Novartis for various cancers, may soon have a new indication. Already approved for a variety of diseases – kidney cancer, pancreatic tumors, and organ rejection prevention – Afinitor shows new promise for breast cancer patients. Clinical data released Monday demonstrate marked improvement for hormone-resistant breast cancer patients when Afinitor, an mTOR inhibitor, is used in...

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BARDA Bets on Boron to Bust Bacteria
Sep16

BARDA Bets on Boron to Bust Bacteria

GlaxoSmithKline recently announced a contract with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), a US government preparedness organization (Note: it’s not often pharma-relevant press releases come from the Public Health Emergency website!). The award guarantees GSK $38.5 million over 2 years towards development of GSK2251052, a molecule co-developed with Anacor Pharma a few years back, as a counter-bioterrorism...

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Amides: Humble But Useful
Sep15

Amides: Humble But Useful

A heartfelt thank-you to Chemjobber and See Arr Oh for helpful discussions! CENtral Science’s benevolent overlord, Rachel Pepling, has organized a blog carnival around the theme of “your favorite chemical reaction”. For the Haystack’s contribution, I thought it would be appropriate to write about a reaction medicinal chemists might find familiar. So I re-read See Arr Oh’s post about which types of reactions...

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Difficult C. difficile Infections – New Drug, New Targets
Aug31

Difficult C. difficile Infections – New Drug, New Targets

Trust your gut . . . scientifically speaking.  From belly-button bacteria to classification of signature microflora (all the various microbes that populate the intestinal tract), it feels like recent popular “culture” grows best in a petri dish. Many scientists now classify humans as superorganisms, meaning our survival depends on a host of “good” internal bacteria that digest fiber, make vitamins, and help the immune system. But what...

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The Right Kinase, Part II – Roche and Daiichi’s Vemurafenib Approved
Aug24

The Right Kinase, Part II – Roche and Daiichi’s Vemurafenib Approved

Last week, the FDA approved Zelboraf (vemurafenib), co-marketed by Roche and Daiichi Sankyo, for the treatment of melanoma characterized by genetic mutation BRAF V600E, which occurs in a subset of the overall patient population. Treatment of late-stage melanoma patients with Zelboraf increases their survival around five months longer than traditional chemotherapy. Cancer-stricken families believe this extra time justifies the $9400 /...

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Tweaking A Workhorse Anesthetic
Aug22

Tweaking A Workhorse Anesthetic

In this week’s issue of C&EN, I’ve written about the search for new anesthetic drugs, as well as the accompanying quest for a better understanding of how anesthetics work. Anesthesia is safer than it’s ever been because highly trained physicians and nurses can manage its complications. The drive to improve anesthetics is nowhere near as strong as it is for other drug classes such as oncology drugs, as Imperial College biophysicist...

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