Liveblogging First-Time Disclosures of Drug Structures from #ACSNOLA
Apr04

Liveblogging First-Time Disclosures of Drug Structures from #ACSNOLA

Bookmark this page now, folks. On Wednesday, April 10, I will be here, liveblogging the public debut of five drug candidates’ structures. The “First Time Disclosures” Session at the ACS National Meeting in New Orleans runs from 2PM-4:55PM Central time. I am not able to conjure up a permalink to the session program, so here’s a screengrab instead. 1:20PM I’m in hall R02, where the session’s set to begin in about 40 minutes. Found a seat with a power outlet nearby, so I’m good to go! 2:29PM BMS-906024 Company: Bristol-Myers Squibb Meant to treat: cancers including breast, lung, colon, and leukemia Mode of action: pan-Notch inhibitor Medicinal chemistry tidbit: The BMS team used an oxidative enolate heterocoupling en route to the candidate– a procedure from Phil Baran’s lab at Scripps Research Institute. JACS 130, 11546 Status in the pipeline: Phase I Relevant documents: WO 2012/129353 3:02PM LGX818 Company: Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research and Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation Meant to treat: melanoma with a specific mutation in B-RAF kinase: V600E Mode of action: selective mutant B-RAF kinase inhibitor Status in the pipeline: Phase Ib/II Relevant documents: WO 2011/023773 ; WO 2011/025927 3:47PM AZD5423 Company: AstraZeneca Meant to treat: respiratory diseases, in particular chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Mode of action: non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor modulators Medicinal chemistry tidbit: This compound originated in part from a collaboration with Bayer Pharma. Status in the pipeline: Phase II Relevant documents: WO 2011/061527 ; WO 2010/008341 ; WO 2009/142568 4:17PM Birinapant (formerly known as TL32711) Company: TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals Meant to treat: cancer Mode of action: blocks the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins to reinstate cancer cell death Status in the pipeline: Phase II Relevant documents: US 8,283,372 5:00PM MGL-3196 (previously VIA-3196) Company: Madrigal Pharmaceuticals, acquired from VIA Pharmaceuticals, licensed from Roche Meant to treat: high cholesterol/high triglycerides Mode of action: mimics thyroid hormone, targeted to thyroid hormone receptor beta in the liver Medicinal chemistry tidbit: this molecule was discovered at Roche’s now-shuttered Nutley site. Status in the pipeline: completed Phase I trials Relevant documents: WO 2007/009913 ; WO 2009/037172 And that’s it, folks! Watch the April 22nd issue of C&EN for more on this...

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Heptares solves first X-ray structure of Family B GPCR, but full details not yet public
Sep17

Heptares solves first X-ray structure of Family B GPCR, but full details not yet public

In what might be the year’s biggest molecular teaser, Heptares Therapeutics has announced that it has solved the first X-ray crystal structure of a G-protein coupled receptor in the Family B subclass. The work provides the first structural insights into a protein family that includes sought-after drug targets such as GLP-1 for diabetes and CGRP for migraine. Largely because of that drug discovery relevance, however, Heptares is choosing to keep its structure somewhat close to the vest. Officials presented views of the structure, of a GPCR called Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF-1) receptor, at conferences on Friday and Monday. But Heptares CEO Malcolm Weir says his team has no immediate plans to publish the structure or to deposit coordinates into the repository known as the Protein Data Bank. The structure, Weir says, is another success for Heptares’ GPCR stabilizing technology, StaR. The technique involves targeted mutations that help to trap a GPCR in a single biologically-relevant state. In the case of CRF-1, Weir says, the stabilized receptor is captured in the “off” state. The structure itself, which is at a resolution of 3 Ångstroms, has the 7-helix membrane-spanning structure typical of GPCRs. However, CRF-1’s architecture is rather different from receptors in Family A, the only GPCR family for which X-ray structures had been available until now, Weir says. “The overall shape of the receptor looks different, the orientation of the helices looks different, and there are detailed differences within helices that are at analogous positions in Family A receptors,” he says. He notes that there are differences in helices 6 and 7, which undergo important motions during GPCR activation. “This is an important breakthrough, although fine details of the structure and release of coordinates may still be some time away,” says Monash University’s Patrick Sexton, an expert in Family B GPCRs who was at Friday’s talk. The structure, he says, confirmed researchers’ expectations that the major differences in membrane-spanning helices between Family A and Family B receptors would occur on the extracellular side. “There was a very open and relatively deep extracellular binding pocket, with the receptor having a ‘V’ shaped appearance,” he says. This open pocket likely contributes to medicinal chemists’ difficulties obtaining high affinity small molecule ligands for Family B receptors, he suggests. That open pocket might be involved in another Family B GPCR mystery, according to Roger Sunahara, also in attendance Friday, who studies GPCRs’ molecular mechanisms at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. All Family B GPCRs, including CRF-1, have a large domain at their amino-terminus that contains large portions of their ligand binding sites. That domain was not included in this structure, he says, but...

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Tetrodotoxin: Why Toxic Is Complicated
May22

Tetrodotoxin: Why Toxic Is Complicated

(This post was written for the “Our Favorite Toxic Chemicals” blog carnival hosted by Sciencegeist.) It was a meal Captain James Cook would just as soon have forgotten. The fish, an unfamiliar species, seemed harmless enough. But after just a small taste of its liver, he and two shipmates regretted it. “We were seized with an extraordinary weakness in all our limbs attended with a numness [sic]…We each of us took a Vomet and after that a Sweat which gave great relief. One of the pigs which had eat the entrails was found dead… When the Natives came on board and saw the fish hanging up, they immidiately [sic] gave us to understand it was by no means to be eat.” Cook had a rather more dramatic introduction to the lethal chemical tetrodotoxin than I did. I learned about it from a lecture in a windowless room. (Yes, I’ve linked to the original slides, still online after eight years.) That presentation had plenty to make my ears perk up. Highly poisonous. No antidote. Still kills today, because pufferfish, one of the web of creatures that makes tetrodotoxin, gets carved into a delicacy called fugu, and sometimes those knives miss a little bit of the animal’s toxic innards. We weren’t learning about tetrodotoxin because of its deadliness. Tetrodotoxin, to the organic chemist, is a case study. The lab where I earned my Ph.D. is in the business of making the toughest molecules it can. The lessons teams learned by forging tetrodotoxin from scratch, the idea goes, will be useful in other endeavors. Chemists for decades have argued about whether this is an appropriate way to train students, but suffice to say it’s still the way that most medicinal chemists in pharma get their start. Tetrodotoxin is different things to different people. To biochemists and neurobiologists, tetrodotoxin, or TTX for short, is a tool for unraveling how pain works. Researchers today know that TTX binds to sodium channel proteins involved with pain pathways in the nervous system. To those who study the cultures of Haiti, tetrodotoxin evokes something else entirely– the zombie of Haitian tradition. In the 1980s, ethnobotanist Wade Davis fingered tetrodotoxin as a key ingredient in a powder witch doctors use in voodoo zombie-making rituals. His doctoral thesis, as well as his bestselling book the “The Serpent and the Rainbow”, about the topic eventually became the basis for a movie of the same name. Davis’s results came under fire from the medical and scientific community. Another team’s measurements of tetrodotoxin levels in the powder detected amounts too low to have any relevant effects, though Davis and another set of...

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TEDMED: Andrew Read’s Five Tips For Keeping Superbugs At Bay
Apr13

TEDMED: Andrew Read’s Five Tips For Keeping Superbugs At Bay

Researchers may like to think they’re pretty smart, but you could argue that bacteria have also got some bragging rights. Every day, microbes develop resistance to even the most powerful antibiotics scientists have developed. Andrew Read thinks evolution is the best lens for staring down the superbugs. He took the stage Thursday at TEDMED, where he warned, “we’re picking a fight with natural selection.” “Picking a fight without Darwin is like going to the moon without Newton,” Read added. “We are in the dark ages when it comes to evolutionary management.” Read, director of Penn State University’s Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, sat down with me on Thursday and shared a few principles he thinks the scientific community should keep in mind in order to keep antibiotic resistance in check. Here are his five tips for would-be superbug slayers. Get smart with the drugs you’ve already got. “We can’t rely on a continual supply of new drugs,” Read said. Many firms have already exited antibiotic research, he notes. “You can see that the markets aren’t good enough right now to drive innovation,” since new antibiotics are precious and used only for patients’ most severe infections rather than being prescribed widely. Read says firms should continually evaluate dosing and combination strategies with established drugs in order to stave off resistance. “I’m not saying we shouldn’t discover new antimicrobials,” Read stressed. “In some situations, like malaria, it’s really critical. But we don’t want to put all our eggs in that basket.” Learn from what works. “I think magic bullets are the exception rather than the rule,” Read says. But researchers should focus on why wildly successful therapies were so. “Why was that pathogen unable to get around the smallpox vaccine? Why is chloroquine still working against some malarias in some parts of the world when it’s has failed miserably in others?” Read asked. Make the right matches for combination therapies. Read notes that some antimalarial drug combinations have consisted of drugs with markedly different half-lives. In effect, once the first drug has left the human body, all that’s left is the other drug, a monotherapy. “And that’s dangerous,” a breeding ground for resistance, Read cautions. “You want to be combining drugs that have similar half-lives.” Researchers should also think about whether their antibiotics become more lethal to microbes when used in combination, or less lethal, Read says. Evidence suggests that less lethal is better, he says. According to work from Roy Kishony’s lab at Harvard Medical School, if an antibiotic combo is less lethal, once resistance develops to one drug (call it drug A) in the pair, then drug B can...

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TEDMED and Alzheimer’s: Gregory Petsko, Reisa Sperling, and the next Al Gore
Apr12

TEDMED and Alzheimer’s: Gregory Petsko, Reisa Sperling, and the next Al Gore

Gregory Petsko knows why he came to TEDMED. “I’m looking for Al Gore,” he told me flat-out over lunch. Folks who know Petskoknow the former Brandeis University biochemistry department chair isn’t one to mince words. And he’s nailed the reason why an academic might want to look outside traditional conferences and soak up some of the TEDMED aura. He’s looking for a charismatic champion to take up a biomedical cause: in Petsko’s case, it’s support for research in Alzheimer’s disease. Petsko and Reisa Sperling, director of the Center for Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, talked about Alzheimer’s at TEDMED on Wednesday. Both talks were cast as calls to action. Just consider the introduction Petsko got from TEDMED chair and Priceline.com founder Jay S. Walker: “This is a man who hears a bomb ticking.” Alzheimer’s statistics are sobering and Petsko used them to dramatic effect. People who will reach 80 by the year 2050 have a 1 in 3 chance of developing the disease if nothing is done, he told the audience. “And yet I hear no clamor,” he said. “I hear no sense of urgency.” Petsko shared some not-yet-published work with TEDMED’s audience. His team is looking at a less-trod path of Alzheimer’s biology– the role protein sorting defects might play in the development of the disease. Their focus is on a protein complex called the retromer, which Petsko likened to a truck driver, because its job is to sort and send proteins either to the golgi–the cell’s recycling center, or to the lysosome for snipping. For Alzheimer’s, the thought is that improper sorting can make the difference between normalcy and an accumulation of amyloid-beta, the protein thought to be a key player in developing the disease. Petsko told me that his collaborator, Scott Small of Columbia University Medical School, discovered that retromer played a role in Alzheimer’s (Neuron, DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2006.09.001).   Petsko’s team has developed small molecules that increase the level of active retromer complex in the cell. So far, their agents have been evaluated in cultured cells. Tests in mice are ongoing. It’s important for the Alzheimer’s field to look beyond amyloid-beta, says Kevin Sweeney, a TEDMED attendee who teaches at the University of California, Berkeley’s Haas School of Business and is part of the Rosenberg Alzheimer’s Project, a nascent organization that supports alternative avenues in Alzheimer’s research. “For a while, at least, the Alzheimer’s space looks like so many of the [clinical] trials have pursued a relatively narrow range of theories,” he says. Even though those theories aren’t fully played out, “we still think it’s useful to start looking for other strands,”...

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