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The Right Kinase, Part II – Roche and Daiichi’s Vemurafenib Approved

Last week, the FDA approved Zelboraf (vemurafenib), co-marketed by Roche and Daiichi Sankyo, for the treatment of melanoma characterized by genetic mutation BRAF V600E, which occurs in a subset of the overall patient population. Treatment of late-stage melanoma patients with Zelboraf increases their survival around five months longer than traditional chemotherapy. Cancer-stricken families believe this extra time justifies the $9400 / month price tag for the treatment, considering the dearth of treatments currently available for these near-terminal patients  (for a more detailed look into the people who brought vemurafenib to market, read Amy Harmon’s New York Times article series from 2010).

Vemurafenib went from concept to approval in just six years, lightning-fast for pharma, which usually takes decades to bring a drug to market. So, what’s the secret behind its success?

Vemurafenib, developed initially by San Francisco pharma company Plexxikon (acquired in 2011 by Daiichi Sankyo) shows all the hallmarks of rational drug design. Initial screening of a 20,000-member compound library against the ATP-binding site of 3 kinases (Pim-1, CSK, and p38) yielded a 7-azaindole lead structure. This approach, known as fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) – the concept that a drug can be built up from a tiny piece as opposed to a high-potency binder –  may represent a first for the industry, as pointed out by Dan Erlanson of blog Practical Fragments. Further synthetic modification of this azaindole fragment, supported by computer binding studies, showed that a hydrophobic (nonpolar) pocket on the enzyme surface could best be filled by a difluoro-phenylsulfonamide group. Biochemical assays confirmed that a ketone linker (in place of the 3-aminophenyl group shown above) between the azaindole and the sulfonamide increased potency. Additionally, a 5-chloro residue on the azaindole eventually became a 4-chlorophenyl group; it’s unclear how this relatively non-polar group helps improve binding, since early active-site models suggest it faces out towards the watery cell cytoplasm.

How is Zelboraf halting melanoma growth? It all comes down to kinase inhibition, a topic covered with both a story and a Haystack post here at C&EN last year. B-RAF, a common gene overexpressed in melanoma cells, produces a protein kinase that is selectively inhibited by Zelboraf. Once shut off, this pathway reinstates a “lost” negative feedback loop for the BRAF V600E tumor cells, resulting in a cascade failure of growth factors further down the line. Cell growth arrest or apoptosis (cell death) follows, but only for the targeted melanoma cells, with no effect on non-cancerous cells.

In an interesting twist, a review published in July shows that inhibitors of Raf kinases (the family of kinases that includes the product of the B-RAF gene) can be developed for either the “activated” or “resting” forms of the enzyme. These two forms of the same enzymatic target show remarkably different clinical applications: Zelboraf targets the “activated” Raf kinase.  Bayer’s Nexavar (sorafenib), a “resting”-form Raf inhibitor, was approved in 2005 for treatment of kidney and liver cancer, but shows little activity against BRAF V600E melanoma.

Update (4:30PM, 8/25/11) – Deleted “in silico” from screening description. Assays were run in vitro using AlphaScreen beads (PerkinElmer).

2 Comments

  • Aug 25th 201111:08
    by Ash

    Are you sure the initial screening was in-silico? I don’t see it in the paper.

  • Aug 25th 201116:08
    by See Arr Oh

    @Ash – You got it. Good catch – the initial library was screened in vitro on AlphaScreen beads, and further kinase inhibition screens (with PLX4720) run using SelectScreen. Thanks!

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