Tucson clinical pharmacist does primary diabetes care

Those of you who do chemistry in colleges of pharmacy are used to discussions of how your graduates can truly use their Doctor of Pharmacy training. You’ve probably often wondered why your students spend so much time in clinical pharmacy when more than half of them end up in community pharmacy, a model that has largely kept its sweatshop-like workflow (the “counseling booth” at my local pharmacy has cobwebs for the simple reason that pharmacists cannot be reimbursed for cognitive services.) Well, I want to bring you a story of how pharmacists can contribute to primary care when in a regulatory environment that makes it possible. The Downtown Tucsonan tells the story of clinical pharmacist, Sandra Leal, a valedictorian graduate of the University of Colorado School of Pharmacy (Disclosure: Sandra was an American Cancer Society supported undergraduate in my laboratory while she was at the University of Arizona who we then recruited to Colorado for her PharmD.) As the first pharmacist in Arizona to earn limited drug prescribing authority, Sandra works in a team-based community practice environment. At El Rio Community Health Center, clinical pharmacists primarily manage long-term care of patients with diabetes while physicians can then work on the more involved acute cases. But the concept didn’t come from a shiny new college of pharmacy with dozens of clinical faculty members. This revolutionary idea of clinical pharmacists working directly with patients is run-of-the-mill medicine south of the border. Leal learned this while growing up in Nogales, Ariz. “My parents didn’t speak English,” Leal said. “We always went to Mexico for health care. You walked into the pharmacy and could get treatment. To me, that was primary care. The pharmacist was my doctor growing up. I never considered any other field. I made a decision in high school that I would be a pharmacist.” You can read more about Leal’s community practice model at the Downtown Tucsonan. You can also learn more about Sandra from a 2009 interview we did back at the old home of Terra Sigillata. The post was part of the Diversity in Science blog carnival during Hispanic Heritage...

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Al Malkinson the Scientist: Eulogy by Dr. Lori Dwyer-Nield
Aug16

Al Malkinson the Scientist: Eulogy by Dr. Lori Dwyer-Nield

In this second part of my remembrance of lung cancer biochemical pharmacologist, Colorado’s Dr. Al Malkinson, I’d like to share with readers some recollections by Lori Dwyer-Nield, PhD. I’ve known Lori since my appointment to Colorado’s faculty in 1992 when she had already been a postdoctoral fellow of Al’s. Dr. Dwyer-Nield continued on as research faculty at the CU School of Pharmacy and co-authored over 40 publications with Al. At Al’s memorial service last Saturday in Boulder, Lori was asked by Al’s wife, Lynn, to eulogize Al on behalf of all his scientific colleagues. Her thoughts were so warmly received that I wanted to share them more widely, especially with members of the scientific community who knew Al but were unable to attend the memorial. Moreover, I had reflected in my previous post how supportive Al was of his women trainees in balancing career and family. This eulogy provides a glimpse into this philosophy of Al’s directly from someone who lived it for over 20 years. My tremendous thanks go out to Lori for agreeing to share with us this text of her eulogy.   Al the Scientist by Lori Dwyer-Nield as presented 11 August 2012 at Community United Church, Boulder, CO It’s an honor to speak about Al the scientist.  Al was my mentor and friend for 21 years, and in that time I learned that ‘Al the scientist’ was a complex character.  The more I think about it, though, I realize that Al the scientist was the same person as Al the family man and Al the writer.  We called Al our lab Dad.  I remember when I first interviewed for a post-doc position in Al’s lab, he had me meet with his lab first, and then with him.  That was quintessential Al.  His approach to lab management was egalitarian.  We all had to approve new lab members before he would let them join.  He saw his lab personnel as colleagues and friends, not employees.    In his eyes, the high school student or dishwasher was just likely to come up with the next great idea as anyone else.  And if someone contributed to a study, they got their name on the paper. He cared about each individual.  It didn’t matter if you needed to talk to him about a personal problem or an irksome experiment.  He did his best to help.  He was happy when one of his lab personnel got married, but he loved the babies.  Many mentors discourage having a family, but Al knew that family was important.  He also felt that we needed to have interests outside the lab, and even told one young...

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On the loss of a mentor: Al Malkinson, lung cancer researcher, scholar, gentleman
Aug11

On the loss of a mentor: Al Malkinson, lung cancer researcher, scholar, gentleman

Note to Readers: After reading through my writing here and at my Take As Directed blog between October, 2011, and October, 2012, I’ve decided to submit this post as my entry for The Best Science Writing Online 2013, formerly The Open Laboratory. The 2012 version was published by the Farrar, Straus and Giroux imprint of Scientific American. While the post details my emotions and recollections over a personal loss, I believe that it best reflects one of my strengths as a science writer: use of a personal story to touch on our own universal experiences as human beings who chose science as our vocation. All of you must have someone like Al Malkinson in your life. And he supported women in science long before special discussions groups on the topic even existed. Finally, I also feel that my closing discussion — the lost art of the Festschrift — is an issue we must revitalize in modern scientific research. We rarely recognize our mentors and leaders while they are alive. I hope that my writing here motivates me (and you) to take action to formally celebrate the contributions of those who are still with us.   Those who make the deepest impression on you become the fabric of your being. Think about those who’ve passed through your life and have influenced your approach to science, society, family. . . Even if years have passed since seeing one another, the lessons and attributes of these very special people continue to stay with you. But rarely do we truly get to express to these treasured souls just how much they have meant to us. My first faculty mentor, lung cancer researcher Alvin M. Malkinson, PhD, passed away last Friday in Boulder, CO, at age 71. Professionally, Al was Professor of Biochemical Pharmacology in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Colorado School of Pharmacy, now on the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora. But if you were fortunate enough to know him, you learned that he was a scholar of the world, lover of the arts, and true gentleman. I last visited the pharmacy school two years ago and had learned from colleagues that Al had been ill. He apparently deteriorated rapidly during this July and passed from pneumonia secondary to other complications. I hadn’t been able to get back to Denver last summer or this year but I now realize that wasn’t an excuse not to at least call Al. I always remember Al as a vibrant, worldly soul whose intellectual energy, I thought, was likely to power him for a couple more decades. Alas, he has left us early...

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Colorado College seeks inorganic chemistry prof

Looking for a tenure-track faculty position at a visionary learning institution in one of the most beautiful places in the United States? Do you prefer non-carbon chemistry? Well, here’s a position for you in Colorado Springs. From The Chronicle of Higher Education:   OPEN TENURE-TRACK POSITIONS Colorado College, a highly selective liberal arts college with an enrollment of approximately 1900 students, seeks to fill five tenure-track positions for Fall 2013 in: Inorganic Chemistry Biological Anthropology Dance Study Global Christianity/ies South Asian History I Information about Colorado College is available at http://www.ColoradoCollege.edu. Interested applicants should refer to the full job descriptions for each position found on the Faculty Positions page under Employment Opportunities, as they become available. Check the website for job closing date. Ph.D. must be complete or very nearly complete before starting date. Colorado College is distinctive for its modular “Block Plan” calendar. The academic year is divided into eight 3 week blocks. During each block, students take and faculty teach one course at a time, with a maximum enrollment of 25 students per class. Faculty teach six blocks per year. The college’s unique academic calendar supports experiential learning opportunities such as field trips and service learning and lends itself to other innovative teaching and learning strategies. The college is committed to increasing the diversity of the college community. Candidates who can contribute to that goal are particularly encouraged to apply and to identify the ways in which they would bring diversity to our community. As an Equal Opportunity Employer, Colorado College welcomes members of all groups and reaffirms its commitment not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, national origin or disability in its educational programs, activities, and employment practices.     I love Colorado Springs and have had the honor of guest lecturing at CC. Several of my colleagues have sent their kids to CC and they have done splendidly. It’s a tremendous learning environment....

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