Aaaaaand They’re Off: The 2013 World Cell Race Results
Dec10

Aaaaaand They’re Off: The 2013 World Cell Race Results

Today's post is by Nader Heidari, an associate editor at C&EN who loves watching cells race and paint dry. On Nov. 22, cells raced down ultrathin channels, vying for the position of fastest cell in the 2013 World Cell Race. At speeds of up to 300 micrometers/hour, cells blew down the maze-like track, running into dead ends and occasionally getting confused and turning around. Many cell lines didn't finish, but glory came to those who did. This year's victor (shown in the race video above) was MDA MB 231 s1, a human breast cancer cell line from Alexis Gautreau of the Laboratory of Enzymology & Structural Biochemistry, in France. Gautreau will receive a €400 voucher (that’s about $650) from Ibidi, one of the event's sponsors. The winning cells weren't the fastest, nor were they the smartest, but they prevailed because of their persistence and because they got a good head-start by entering the maze of channels more quickly than their competitors. Slow and steady wins the race! In second place was MFH 152, a sarcoma cell line from Mohamed Jemaà in Ariane Abrieu’s lab at the Research Center for Macromolecular Biochemistry, in France. Although they were fast and accurate, these cells took too long to actually start the race, falling behind MDA MB 231, according to the race organizers. Cell-racing fans don't have to wait until late next year for another dose of mitochondria-pumping action: The organizers are looking to start the first "Dicty World Race," tentatively scheduled for March 21, 2014. The stars of this show would be Dictyostelium, a type of slime mold. So keep an eye out for some pedal-to-the-flagella protist action! Related Stories: Cellular...

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In Print: Racing Cells, Baby Dinos
Nov11

In Print: Racing Cells, Baby Dinos

The Newscripts blog would like to be closer Internet buddies with our glossy print Newscripts column, so here we highlight what's going on this week’s issue of C&EN. Microscopic organisms, start your engines! The second World Cell Race is upon us. Doping and steroids in the form of genetic modifications and unusual cell types are welcome in this competition to create the fastest and smartest cellular contestant. As C&EN associate editor Nader Heidari writes in this week's print column, this year's World Cell Race will be held on Nov. 22 at the BioMEMS Resource Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, in Boston (watch the live broadcast here). The cited purpose of the race is to inspire discussion about how cell motility plays a role in health and disease. The Newscripts gang also wouldn't be surprised if cell biologists were champing at the bit to enter a (relatively) high-speed racing contest. Unlike the inaugural World Cell Race in 2011 that featured a linear track, this year's race will force champion-hopefuls to navigate a maze-like course. Creating "smart" cells that don't just Roomba their way into a dead end will add another dimension of design complexity. Nader says the organizers haven't entirely revealed just how these souped-up cells are expected to make wise decisions on their paths to victory, but he's putting his money on stem cells. "They're pretty fast," Nader says. "Some went up to 5ish µm a minute! This next contest will have molds, however, so we'll see how they compare, even though they'll need special tracks because of their size." The second part of Nader's Newscripts discusses a keen-eyed teen who was first to spot a fossil on his high school's trip to Utah's Grand Staircaise-Escalante National Monument in 2009. While traipsing through rock formations on an exploratory trip led by paleontologist Andrew A. Farke, high schooler Kevin Terris peeked under a stone and ended up discovering the smallest and most complete fossil of the dinosaur Parasaurolophus yet. Farke's research group has been investigating the fossil and has recently published a paper about the baby dino, whom they've endearingly nicknamed "Joe." And Nader tells the Newscripts gang that the researchers think it's unlikely they'll discover anything quite like it again: "Joe's find is a ridiculously rare glimpse into childhood development of these dinos. It's crazy to find a relatively complete baby dino fossil, mostly because they tend to be bite-sized morsels for predators and have softer bones that wouldn't fossilize as well." Nader adds that the paleontology team "had a very tiny geological window to find and preserve the fossil as well. Farke doesn't think he'll ever find another such fossil in...

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