Fashion Police: Science Shoes
Mar27

Fashion Police: Science Shoes

Today’s post is by Emily Bones, a production editor and Newscripts contributor here at C&EN. Eating vegan food is a well-known practice, but wearing vegan shoes is new to the Newscripts gang. Now that the shoe company TOMS has added a periodic table design to its Vegan Classics line, perhaps chemists should consider sporting a partially vegan wardrobe. With a canvas top and a sole made of rubber or rope, these simple but recognizable shoes debuted in 2006 after Blake Mycoskie, founder and “chief shoe giver” of the company, took a trip to Argentina. Many children in Argentina are impoverished and shoeless, which is a detriment to their development, he observed. To help them, Mycoskie devised a One-for-One plan when the company was born: Every time a pair of TOMS shoes are purchased, the company sends an additional pair to children in need through giving partners. Originally, underprivileged Argentinian children were the “sole” recipients, but with the success of the company and the program, children in more than 50 countries can now benefit. The distinct style of all TOMS shoes is inspired by Argentinian culture, where they are known as alpargatas. The company has taken some creative license for shoes available for purchase, however. The shoes that they donate are usually black slip-on style; if they had laces, families wouldn’t be able to afford to replace them if they break. The periodic table shoes and all of its Vegan Classics companions go a step further in their global awareness – they are made with pesticide-free cotton and suede-free insoles. And they're nerdy cool. More than 2 million shoes have been donated because of the One-for-One program, and with the trendy periodic table shoe, chemists can do their part to help the movement. A TOMS representative says it is up to the production team to choose the designs, so she isn’t certain why the periodic table was the lucky print for TOMS to feature. “They are an online exclusive dedicated to our science-loving supporters, and to promote planetary friendliness. They are light and colorful, just like the periodic table,” she says. If you want to be stylish and splash some chemistry in your wardrobe, these are the shoes for you. And they’re closed-toe, so appropriate for the lab!...

Read More
Amusing News Aliquots
Apr19

Amusing News Aliquots

Silly samplings from this week's science news. Compiled by Bethany Halford and Lauren Wolf. If you give red roses for love and daisies signify innocence, one shudders to think what the terrifying blooms of the Hydnora Africana represent. [io9] Scientists construct world’s biggest shake table for earthquake testing. Place five-story building, complete with two floors of mock hospital, on top. [U-T San Diego] We want this guy on our side: Scientist uses physics-based explanation to get out of traffic ticket, then writes paper about it. [Wired] Pass the buckyball-flavored ice cream: Eating C60 might, in the future, extend your lifespan. And, no, we’re not joking. [io9] These fish glow fluorescent green when exposed to estrogenic pollutants. We hear they’re great for river-cruise parties. [ScienceDaily] Fellas, want to look taller and more muscular? Apparently, you simply need to be holding a gun. [LA Times] When humans are gone from the face of the Earth, will our shoes still wash up on shores?...

Read More
Amusing News Aliquots
Aug11

Amusing News Aliquots

Silly samplings from this week's science news. Mighty mice resist most poisons. Newscripts gang stands on a chair and flips out. [BBC] Your know your hobby is out of hand when you mix Americium, Radium, and Beryllium in 96% sulfuric-acid and it explodes on your stovetop. [Guardian] and [LATimes] Pets should earn their keep. If you’ve got a running rodent, you should check out the hamster shredder. [Tom Ballhatchet] Chilean company wants to put copper in your undies. [Guanabee] Heat beating up your feet? Then these air-conditioned shoes might be for you. [Topless Robot] The presence or absence of aluminum in soil makes hydrangeas blue or pink....

Read More