Chem Coach Carnival – Science Writing
Oct23

Chem Coach Carnival – Science Writing

Happy Mole Day, and happy National Chemistry Week! Today, I'm heeding SeeArrOh's call to contribute a post to his blog carnival, the Chem Coach carnival. The theme is chemistry career paths. My current job: I'm a senior editor at Chemical & Engineering News magazine. That title is confusing, however. I really am a science writer, not an editor. My home base is the ACS building in downtown Washington DC. (I can see the White House from my office window). I write everything from 1500-word cover stories to 140 character tweets. I also work on videos and other multimedia for C&EN Online. What I do in a standard "work day": I've made a pie chart about this for when I give career talks. For someone who makes their living writing, it's actually not what I spend most of my time doing. I'd classify my most common activity as 'information gathering'- calling people up, reading the literature, searching grant databases, scanning social media, etc. There is no 'standard work day'. My week revolves around getting the magazine out, but that's the basic skeleton around which I fit all my tasks. What kind of schooling / training / experience helped me get there: I could tell you how I became a science writer, but that wouldn't be very useful information in isolation, because just about every science writer I know took a different path to get there. If you're really interested in doing what I do, go to Ed Yong's fantastic Not Exactly Rocket Science blog and read all the 'how I got there' tales from science writers there. (I'm number 108 on the list). I would be remiss if I didn't mention that science writing jobs are TOUGH to get these days, especially if you have your heart set on working at a newspaper or newsstand magazine. If your goal is to write for a government agency, university, or institute, you may have more opportunities, though it's not exactly the land of milk and honey there either. Finally, a lot of my science writer friends have at some point worked as freelancers. Many go back and forth between freelancing and staff gigs. If you are uncomfortable with the idea of running your own business at some point in your career, this may not be the path for you. How chemistry informs my work: I once had an editor that likened my chemistry Ph.D. to a language degree. That is the best way I can describe how my training helps me do my job. I'm exposed to corners of chemistry and aspects of chemists' lives I never encountered in the lab (origin-of-life...

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The value of internships for non-traditional science careers
May11

The value of internships for non-traditional science careers

So I want to be a science writer. But I’m a grad student who has been working in a lab doing research for the past four years. Will I be qualified for a job in my non-traditional science career of choice when I graduate? How can I poise myself to be competitive and market myself as a science writer when the reality is that I’m a bench chemist who has been dabbling in writing here and there? Bingo. An internship. A real hands-on experience doing the work I want to do. An opportunity to make connections with people in the field. And last but not least, a little breather and some time away from the lab doing the job I can’t wait to do once I’m out of school. Since the time I started considering science writing as a future career, I have been connecting with science writers—learning about their career paths and asking for advice. I have gleaned all sorts of useful information through these “informational interviews.” Every science writer I’ve talked to seems to have taken a slightly different path to arrive at the same destination. But there was one piece of advice that nearly every science writer gave me: Take an internship. Internship— sounds great! Now just let me go ask my adviser for three months off. Many advisers, I believe, would not be thrilled. My adviser was supportive, perhaps hesitantly. But in the end he wanted me to do what I needed to do. So I applied for science writing internships earlier this year and I landed the science writing internship at a high-energy physics lab. I’ve been working full-time as a science writer for nearly a month now. And I LOVE it. I’m growing as a writer and reporter, I’m learning about all the awesome physics that the lab is up to and I’m exploring the world of web interfaces as I manage the daily news site. One particularly satisfying aspect of taking this internship has been that every day I wake up and my job is to be a science writer. No more late nights spent writing my stories after a long day in the lab (except for when I’m blogging for JAEP!). It’s awesome. I could easily spend the rest of this post gushing about how much I love my internship, and how awesome internships are, and how everyone should do them. But I decided to seek some input from other science writers and hear what they had to say on the topic. After all, everyone’s experience is different. And internships are really competitive—so I wanted to gather advice from different people...

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