Haystack 2011 Year-in-Review
Jan03

Haystack 2011 Year-in-Review

Well, 2011 is in the books, and we here at The Haystack felt nostalgic for all the great chemistry coverage over this past year, both here and farther afield. Let’s hit the high points: 1. HCV Takes Off – New treatments for Hepatitis C have really gained momentum. An amazing race has broken out to bring orally available, non-interferon therapies to market. In October, we saw Roche acquire Anadys for setrobuvir, and then watched Pharmasset’s success with PSI-7977 prompt Gilead’s $11 billion November buyout.  And both these deals came hot on the heels of Merck and Vertex each garnering FDA approval for Victrelis and Incivek, respectively, late last spring. 2. Employment Outlook: Mixed – The Haystack brought bad employment tidings a few times in 2011, as Lisa reported. The “patent cliff” faced by blockbuster drugs, combined with relatively sparse pharma pipelines, had companies tightening their belts more than normal. Traffic also increased for Chemjobber Daily Pump Trap updates, which cover current job openings for chemists of all stripes. The highlight, though, might be his Layoff Project.  He collects oral histories from those who’ve lost their jobs over the past few years due to the pervasive recession and (slowly) recovering US economy.. The result is a touching, direct, and sometimes painful collection of stories from scientists trying to reconstruct their careers, enduring salary cuts, moves, and emotional battles just to get back to work. 3. For Cancer, Targeted Therapies – It’s also been quite a year for targeted cancer drugs. A small subset of myeloma patients (those with a rare mutation) gained hope from vemurafenib approval. This molecule, developed initially by Plexxikon and later by Roche / Daiichi Sankyo, represents the first success of fragment-based lead discovery, where a chunk of the core structure is built up into a drug with help from computer screening.From Ariad’s promising  ponatinib P2 data for chronic myeloid leukemia, to Novartis’s Afinitor working in combination with aromasin to combat resistant breast cancer. Lisa became ‘xcited for Xalkori, a protein-driven lung cancer therapeutic from Pfizer. Researchers at Stanford Medical School used GLUT1 inhibitors to starve renal carcinomas of precious glucose, Genentech pushed ahead MEK-P31K inhibitor combinations for resistant tumors, and Incyte’s new drug Jakifi (ruxolitinib), a Janus kinase inhibitor, gave hope to those suffering from the rare blood cancer myelofibrosis. 4. Sirtuins, and “Stuff I Won’t Work With  – Over at In the Pipeline, Derek continued to chase high-profile pharma stories. We wanted to especially mention his Sirtris / GSK coverage (we had touched on this issue in Dec 2010). He kept up with the “sirtuin saga” throughout 2011, from trouble with duplicating life extension in model organisms to the...

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Macrocycle Milestone for Ironwood Pharma
Aug17

Macrocycle Milestone for Ironwood Pharma

Ironwood Pharmaceuticals and Forest Laboratories last week announced submission of an NDA for linaclotide, a peptide macrocycle for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This is the first new drug application for Ironwood, a 13-year old Cambridge, MA company, and it could validate other companies’ strategies for large-ring drugs (covered recently by Carmen Drahl in C&EN). There’s an enormous potential market for this drug; by Ironwood’s count, a combined 45 million people in the US suffer from IBS and related chronic constipation (CC), yet few drugs are approved for these conditions. So, how does linaclotide help IBS sufferers, um . . . go? This 14-amino acid peptide ring, taken orally, arrives at the intestinal lumen, where, according to Ironwood patent literature, it docks with a receptor enzyme called guanylate cyclase C (GC-C). The extracellular domain (part that sticks out of the cell membrane), upon binding, initiates the intracellular domain (inside the cell) to begin production of guanosine-3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), a signaling molecule that induces changes in the intestinal wall. In short, cGMP prompts the intestinal surface to release chloride and bicarbonate ions into the intestinal tract, which decreases sodium uptake and increases fluid secretion (Note: interestingly, this is similar to the body’s response upon E.coli infection; a bacterial toxin called ST-peptide causes traveller’s diarrhea). In Ironwood’s own words, these physiological changes “accelerate intestinal transit,” which helps to move solid waste and decrease overall pain by acting on local nerve responses. Update (3:20PM, 8/17/11) - Changed "nearly 45 million people in the US alone suffer from IBS, yet few drugs are approved for this condition" to "combined 45 million people in the US suffer from IBS and related chronic constipation (CC), yet few drugs are approved for these...

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