This Week on CENtral Science: Papal Chemistry, Neuroscience of Magic, Pi Day, and more
Mar15

This Week on CENtral Science: Papal Chemistry, Neuroscience of Magic, Pi Day, and more

Tweet of the Week: Pope Francis, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, came late to the priesthood after studying chemistry. My question is: What turned him off to chemistry?— Gary Garchar (@ggarchar) March 14, 2013 I've had a blast as CENtral Science overlord. Like other despots before me, I have a hard time letting go of power. So now that Rachel's back, we'll be switching off on these roundup posts each month. To the network: Fine Line: Waldorf Time Again Grand CENtral: Top 10 Shoutouts to Pope Francis and Chemistry – Storify Just Another Electron Pusher: A Troubling Shift in Tradition Newscripts: Alakazam! The Neuroscience of Magic and Amusing News Aliquots and There & Back Again: A Cyclotron’s Tale Terra Sigillata: How Would You Explain pH to First-Graders? and Are Popes and Chemistry Immiscible? The Safety Zone: UK thallium and arsenic poisoning case neither accident nor suicide attempt and Explosives case continued for former UC Davis chemist David Snyder and Friday chemical safety round up *not up as of 4:20PM Eastern, but this link will work when it posts. The Watch Glass: “Inert” Xenon Reacts with Fluorine and Nanotubes' Electronic Properties and Bohemian retorts and Calculate pi with frozen hot dogs and Albert Ghiorso: Element...

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Amusing News Aliquots
Feb09

Amusing News Aliquots

Silly samplings from the week's science news, compiled by Bethany Halford and Lauren Wolf. For pigeon-free statues, lace your bronze with arsenic. [Guardian] Fracture putty: Like silly putty with healing powers. OK, not like silly putty at all, to be honest. [geek.com] A monkey and a man walk into an fMRI machine. Then they watch a Clint Eastwood western. Punchline: Brain regions that do the same job in monkeys and men aren’t always in the same spot in the skull. [PopSci] Whoopsie! I was trying to make graphene but ended up making the world’s thinnest pane of glass. [Science Now] Chemists use NMR to track the progress of the coffee-roasting process. Does this mean Starbucks will be hiring NMR spectroscopists? [J. Ag. Food Chem.] Man arrested last year for trying to split the atom in his kitchen has collection of chemical elements in his bedroom. Mentions nonchalantly to reporter: "This thallium is very, very poisonous. If you get it on your fingers, you can die." We feel safe now. [Guardian] Want to know if that pop tune you’re penning in your spare time will be a hit? There’s an app for that. [LA...

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