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Easy Holiday Shopping for Positive Solar News

The end of 2013 is shaping up to be merry for the solar industry. It’s been a tough few years – as European governments cut back on incentives, inventories of solar panels, cells, and even raw materials started to pile up. But all that is getting sorted out, and a bunch more positive news is starting to point to a happy 2014 and beyond.

Japan solar plant

A 70MW solar installation in Japan’s Kagoshima prefecture.

Demand for solar in China, Japan, the U.S. and even Europe has been strong since the summer. The pull has been felt througout the supply chain, but is not likely to be so strong that solar will become more expensive for end-users.

One sad tale this year has been a trade war between the developed home countries of some solar makers (in Europe and the U.S.) and China. But it looks like the compromise that the EU and China reached in July will stick, says Bloomberg. Perhaps those discussions will serve as a model for U.S.-China relations.

Speaking of the U.S., In October, 12 new solar installations accounted for 504 MW or 72.1 percent of all new electricity capacity last month. For the year, solar’s share is more like 21%. The Earthtechling blog digs into numbers from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

Solar companies are sending positive signals to investors – and company stock has been soaring, points out Dana Blankenhorn at The Street.

At Lux Research, analyst Ed Cahill is taking a longer view. He says that solar will become competitive with natural gas by 2025, or if gas prices are between $4.90 and $9.30 MMBtu, perhaps as early as 2020. Apparently natural gas is a helpmate to solar – because using both together “can accelerate adoption and increase intermittent renewable penetration without expensive infrastructure improvements.”

Cahill says solar will become broadly competitive across the globe and that solar system prices will fall to $1.20 per W, from $1.96 per W in 2030 as modules get more efficient. One trend from the past will continue to dog the solar industry – as countries (and in the U.S., states) change policies, the industry will continue to see ups and downs. [Here's a press release about the report, along with a map]

2 Comments

  • Dec 4th 201312:12
    by Farnco Giribaldi

    The 70MW installation in Kagoshima prefecture is simply amazing!
    We have nothing like that here in Europe…

  • Mar 7th 201400:03
    by Brisbane Solar

    We have certainly seen a huge rise in the uptake of solar installations in Australia. Partly due to government funded initiatives, and partly due to increasing electricity costs.
    The fact that China now has a huge demand for solar panels will only drive the price down further – great news.

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