How Green is Your University?

It's been so many years since I applied to college that I had forgotten all about those Princeton Review books designed to help high school students select an institution of higher learning. This year, Princeton Review has teamed up with the U.S. Green Building Council to publish a guide to green campuses. I took a moment to look up how my alma mater, The University of Virginia, made out in the green rankings. It turns out that there aren't any rankings. But I enjoyed reading about the steps the University has taken in recent years to become more sustainable, especially since I  majored in Environmental Sciences way back in [redacted] when few people could even define "sustainability."  (Actually, that last bit is still a little tricky). Thomas Jefferson's university has been busy since my graduation. According to the guide, in 2007 it decreed that all new buildings would be LEED certified. UVa is developing a carbon reduction plan, has decreased its water usage and spends 16% of its food budget on local and organic food. So I'd like to send out an enthusiastic Happy Earth Day to the University of Virginia, and especially to all the great professors and students in the department of environmental sciences.

Author: Melody Bomgardner

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  1. It might make it into the green rankings if pupils stopped walking on all the fresh snow.