#Chemsafety presentations at #ACSSanDiego
Mar30

#Chemsafety presentations at #ACSSanDiego

The American Chemical Society Division of Chemical Health & Safety has posted slides from its sessions at the ACS National Meeting in San Diego: Safety begins in the classroom: Demonstrations, awareness, & pre-lab planning How Texas Tech and UCLA have affected laboratory safety nationwide Developing, implementing & teaching hazard assessment tools Chemical, sample, and asset management tools CHAS posters and presentations in the divisions of chemical information and...

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#Chemsafety programming at #ACSSanDiego
Mar10

#Chemsafety programming at #ACSSanDiego

The 251st ACS National Meeting starts on Sunday in San Diego. Here’s what’s planned for chemical and laboratory safety; the Division of Chemical Health & Safety has its usual CHAS-At-A-Glance ready for printing. You can also find CHAS and the Committee on Chemical Safety in the Expo at booth 1128. SUNDAY Morning Division of Chemical Health & Safety Executive Committee Meeting (agenda book); 8:30-11:00 am, Hilton Gaslamp, Santa Rosa Room The Two Year Guidelines: What’s New; 8:30-11:50 am, Manchester Grand Hyatt, Promenade B (CHED) Chemistry-based technology programs in the 2015 ACS Guidelines for Chemistry in Two-Year College Programs Importance of partnerships in two-year college chemistry programs Safety in the 2015 two-year guidelines Student skills in the 2015 two-year guidelines Importance of student mentoring in the chemical sciences at the community college Student transfer and the guidelines for chemistry in two-year college programs Emerging trends in the two year college landscape Afternoon Safety Begins in the Classroom: Demonstrations, Awareness & Pre-Lab Planning; 1:30-3:40 pm, Hilton Gaslamp, Marina Room (CHAS) Wild, wild west to GHS: Reflections on my first year as a general chemistry laboratory coordinator Safety education for early lab students: How do they learn it before they need it? Chemical demonstrations: The good, the bad, the ugly Development of demonstrations – a collaborative project between the safety office and teaching assistants Ask Dr. Safety: About Incident Reporting; 3:50-5:15 pm, Hilton Gaslamp, Marina Room (CHAS) Anatomy of an incident report When things go wrong … Incident reporting Fall 2015 InterCollegiate Cheminformatics Course; 1:30-4:30 pm, Manchester Grand Hyatt, Mission Beach A/B (CHED) Future intercollegiate course management systems: Under the hood of the Cheminformatics OLCC Future intercollegiate course management systems: Part 2 – An extensible nodal network of TLOs (Teaching and Learning Objects) Better data habits for better science: Chemical information literacy in the digital era Talking about cheminformatics to undergraduate chemistry majors Facilitators perspective on teaching chemical informatics as part of the Online Collaborative Chemistry (OLCC) course Cheminformatics directed study with OLCC Reviewing PubChem laboratory chemical safety summaries for different user types Division of Chemical Education Safety Committee Meeting; 4:00-5:30 pm, Embassy Suites San Diego Downtown Bay, Mariposa MONDAY Morning Committee on Chemical Safety and Executive Meeting; 7:30 am-12:30 pm, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, Sapphire Ballroom E/F Afternoon How Texas Tech & UCLA Have Affected Laboratory Safety Nationwide; 1:30-5:00 pm, Hilton Gaslamp, Marina Room (CHAS) We better watch out: Prevention beats reparation Digging deep: The response to cultural issues Changing a culture: The accident at Texas Tech; what happened in the next five years, and why you should develop a culture of safety: Thoughts from the department chair at the time...

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OPRD’s safety notables from the literature
Feb24

OPRD’s safety notables from the literature

Organic Process Research & Development has just released its 13th annual compilation of safety issues from scientific literature. It covers: Accidents Fire and Explosion Disasters in Aftermath of Great East Japan Earthquake Lab Explosion during Distillation of Propargyl Thiocyanate Lessons Learned from Process Safety Incidents Zinc Plant Explosion Methyl Mercaptan Accident Tianjin Blast Thermal Hazard Evaluations Decoupling Heat Absorption and Generation from Azobis(isobutyronitrile) Decomposition Ammonium Nitrate Thermal Decomposition with Additives Thermal Hazard Assessment for Synthesis of 3-Methylpyridine-N-oxide Analysis of Safety and Kinetic Parameters for Organic Peroxide Decomposition Prediction of Self-Accelerating Decomposition Temperature for Organic Peroxides Math Methods for Application of Experimental Adiabatic Data Vent Sizing of Cumene Hydroperoxide System under Fire Scenario Differential Scanning Calorimetry Analysis of Liquid Sodium-Silica Reaction Beyond the Phi Factor Thermal Stability of Propylene Oxide Hazard Assessment Methodology Systems Theoretic Accident Modeling and Processes (STAMP)—Holistic System Safety Approach or Another Risk Model? Decisions and Decision Support for Major Accident Prevention in Industry Process Safety Management for Managing Contractors in Process Plant Laboratory Safety Culture What Does “Safe” Look and Feel Like? Methods for Identifying Errors in Chemical Process Development and Design Methods and Models in Process Safety and Risk Management: Past, Present and Future Chemical Reactivity in PHA Scale-up and Scalable Reaction Conditions Application of Safety by Design Scale-up of Epoxide Ring-Opening Scale-up of Alkoxyamines Scale-up of Processes using DMSO Alternative Reagents Trifluoromethylation with Sodium Trifluoromethanesulfinate Iodonium Ylides as Safe Carbene Precursors Improved Method for Generation of Ohira–Bestmann Reagent Nonafluorobutanesulfonyl Azide as a Shelf Stable Oxidant Additional Trifluoromethylation with Sodium Trifluoromethanesulfinate Deoxyfluorination of Phenols with PhenoFluorMix New Reagent for Synthesis of CF3-Substituted Arenes and Heteroarenes A New Deoxyfluorination Reagent Dust Hazards Influence of Inert Materials on Flammable Dust Self-Ignition Hazard Evaluation Method for Dust Collector Explosions Dust Explosions in Process...

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Hydrocyanation without using hydrogen cyanide
Feb23

Hydrocyanation without using hydrogen cyanide

From this week’s C&EN, a method to conduct hydrocyanation without using hydrogen cyanide and–bonus!–with reversibility: Xianjie Fang, Peng Yu, and Bill Morandi of the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research use a nickel catalyst as a shuttle to pluck hydrogen and a cyano group from a donor nitrile and transfer them to an alkene to form a nitrile. The team shows the reaction is useful to make aryl nitriles and for functionalizing biomolecules such as tyrosine and estrone. In addition, the transfer hydrocyanation is made reversible on demand by selecting starting reagents that control the thermodynamic equilibrium of the reaction—the nitriles can be reverted to complementary alkenes. The team uses this retrohydrocyanation to make styrene, terpene, and aliphatic alkene derivatives from nitriles. The paper is in Science, DOI:...

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National Safety Stand-Down May 2-6
Feb18

National Safety Stand-Down May 2-6

What safety thing do you know you need to do but haven’t yet managed: Lab clean-out? Emergency drill? Write or update standard operating procedures? The Occupational Safety & Health Administration and other federal agencies have set May 2-6 as a National Safety Stand-Down. It’s geared toward preventing falls in construction, but individual labs or departments could certainly use it for inspiration. The idea is to take a break from normal operations to focus on safety. Options to consider, in addition to what’s above: Teach risk assessment (learn the “bow tie” tool at the ACS meeting in San Diego) Hold some sort of safety training, maybe including using a fog machine to demonstrate fume hood flow, adding acid to eggs to show the necessity of eye protection, rinsing whipped cream off goggles in an eye wash station, and having someone use a safety shower (ideas from University of California, Irvine, chemistry department) Have your lab group group go through a “what if” analysis of a piece of equipment or experiment to discuss what could go wrong and how to avoid it (idea from Texas Tech University’s Dominick Casadonte) Run an emergency drill to have lab members walk through how to respond to a worst-case spill, fire, or some other incident Go around your department and take photos of good safety practices, then show them before a seminar Hold a safety video contest (idea from University of Minnesota chemical engineering and material science department) Have lab groups create safety demonstrations related to their research (idea from Stony Brook University chemistry department) Develop a contest in which lab groups compete against each other to develop best practices and pass inspections (idea from University of Texas, Austin, chemistry...

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Applying the “new view” safety philosophy to laboratories
Feb17

Applying the “new view” safety philosophy to laboratories

Coming up on March 2 is a free webinar on “The New View: Tools for Engineering a Stronger Lab Safety Culture,” sponsored by BioRaft. What is the new view? I’m still trying to figure that out. Here’s one summary from J. Safe. Res. 2002, DOI: 10.1016/S0022-4375(02)00032-4: One view, recently dubbed ‘‘the old view’’ (AMA, 1998; Reason, 2000), sees human error as a cause of failure. In the old view of human error: Human error is the cause of most accidents. The engineered systems in which people work are made to be basically safe; their success is intrinsic. The chief threat to safety comes from the inherent unreliability of people. Progress in safety can be made by protecting these systems from unreliable humans through selection, proceduralization, automation, training, and discipline. The other view, also called ‘‘the new view,’’ sees human error not as a cause, but as a symptom of failure (AMA, 1998; Hoffman & Woods, 2000; Rasmussen & Batstone, 1989; Reason, 2000; Woods, Johannesen, Cook, & Sarter, 1994). In the new view of human error: Human error is a symptom of trouble deeper inside the system. Safety is not inherent in systems. The systems themselves are contradictions between multiple goals that people must pursue simultaneously. People have to create safety. Human error is systematically connected to features of people tools, tasks, and operating environment. Progress on safety comes from understanding and influencing these connections. Here’s a more recent blog post exploring what “new view” means. The “new view” is also related to a perspective called Safety II, which is described in this whitepaper by the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation. As for the webinar itself, BioRaft says it will cover: Safety professionals in diverse industries around the world use the New View to improve communication and safety in their organizations, so why not bring this methodology to lab safety? In this free webinar, speakers Dave Christenson and Ron Gantt will teach you the philosophy behind the New View, what it is capable of accomplishing, and how you can go out and begin to make it work for you. After completing this webinar, you will: – Understand what the New View is and how it improves communication and safety. – Learn why industries like nuclear power rely on the New View. – Be able to use the New View to assess your safety culture. – Have the tools to build trust in your organization. – Receive practical suggestions on how to start using this methodology in your...

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