Lab safety at the Biennial Conference on Chemical Education
Dec20

Lab safety at the Biennial Conference on Chemical Education

Contributed by Samuella B. Sigman, lecturer and chemical hygiene officer at Appalachian State University, and Ralph Stuart, secretary of the ACS Division of Chemical Health & Safety and environmental safety manager at Keene College. At the Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (BCCE) earlier this year, we participated in a variety of workshops and symposia that addressed chemical safety in the higher education setting. A symposium on “New directions in academic lab safety” discussed several projects that support development of a lab safety culture in the academic setting. Presentations discussed ways to foster student involvement in safety outreach efforts, the cultural impact of developing an undergraduate lab safety course, and the opportunities and challenges presented by the globally harmonized system for hazard communication in the teaching lab setting. The full list of talks in this symposium included: Improving the culture of safety through student-led initiatives; Alice Paterno, Duquesne University Perceptions of student safety; David E. Gardner, Lander University Two credit laboratory safety course for undergraduate students; Michael Kahlow, University of Wisconsin, River Falls Improving safety training in teaching laboratories: New training modules for teaching assistants; Jay Wickenden, University of British Columbia From MSDS to SDS: Ideas to increase knowledge of chemical safety throughout the undergraduate curriculum; E. Kate Walker, University of Texas, Dallas Safety data sheets from suppliers: For lecturers, teachers, and technicians in education, just how useful is this document; Bob Worley, CLEAPSS (a U.K. science advisory service for educators) Plan to help chemical health and safety take its rightful place in the chemistry curriculum; David C. Finster, Wittenberg University In a second symposium, “How and why we do chemical demonstrations,” members of the ACS Division of Chemical Education’s Safety Committee discussed revisions to the division’s recently updated guidelines for chemical demonstrations. The guidance document gives special attention to scope, location, planning, and risk assessment and is targeted towards educational professionals with science training. It seeks to align best practices with recommendations from the National Fire Protection Association while informing users what they should do before, during, and after a demonstration in order to ensure the safety of demonstrators and audience members. As part of this symposium, one of us, Sammye, presented a paper on basic risk assessment development. This talk, “Hazard and risk assessment for chemical demonstrations,” focused on practical guidance for determining the hazards of a demonstration and how to collect and organize information into a basic risk assessment using five fundamental safety questions. The full list of talks in this symposium included: Why and how to use chemistry demonstrations; David C. Finster, Wittenberg University Revising CHEDs “Minimum Safety Guidelines for Chemical Demonstrations”; Monique Wilhelm, University of...

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Journal of Chemical Health & Safety, November-December issue
Dec14

Journal of Chemical Health & Safety, November-December issue

Here’s what’s in the November-December issue of the Journal of Chemical Health & Safety: Editorial: Risk tolerance, by Harry J. Elston Effects of work practices and upper body movements on the performance of a laboratory fume hood, by Kwangseog Ahn (University of Wisconsin, Whitewater), Michael J. Ellenbecker (University of massachusetts, Lowell), Susan R. Woskie (University of massachusetts, Lowell), and Louis J. DiBerardinis (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) The application of ductless hoods in laboratories: What everyone should know, by Louis J. DiBerardinis (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Evaluation of a secondary school cosmetology safety and health training’s effectiveness after implementation of a hierarchy of controls “pyramid game” using the “salon safety quiz,” by Alexa A. Patti, Alexsandra A. Apostolico, Lindsey J. Milich, Amy G. Lewis, Alison T. Murtha, and Derek G. Shendell (Rutgers School of Public Health) Verification study of an emerging fire suppression system, by Michael E. Cournoyer, R. Ryan Waked, Howard N. Granzow, and David C. Gubernatis (Los Alamos National Laboratory Heat and mass transfer simulation of the human airway for nano-particle water vapor, by Masoud Khajenoori and Ali Haghighi Asl (Semnan University, Iran) Anatomy of an incident, by Michael E. Cournoyer, Stanley Trujillo, Cindy M. Lawton, Whitney M. Land, and Stephen B. Schreiber (Los Alamos National Laboratory) Terephthalic acid, by William E. Luttrell and Robert L. Hester (Oklahoma Christian University) Hydrogen fluoride and alkylation, by Neal Langerman (Advanced Chemical...

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New safety guidelines for chemical demonstrations released
Dec13

New safety guidelines for chemical demonstrations released

The ACS Division of Chemical Education recently finalized new safety guidelines for chemical demonstrations, following a number of injuries from demo fires and other mishaps in the last several years. The guidelines build on similar efforts by the U.S. National Fire Protection Association and Chemical Safety & Hazard Investigation Board. The new guidelines seem straightforward and contain nothing surprising. Hopefully they’ll help prevent further injuries. You can download the guidelines here. For a graphical version of the similar National Fire Protection Guidelines, see...

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Risk perception and communication in C&EN
Dec08

Risk perception and communication in C&EN

Cognitive psychologist Baruch Fischhoff of Carnegie Mellon University writes about risk perception and communication in C&EN this week: Whether judging the risks of a chemical, a financial product, or a looming pandemic, when people lack facts, they must rely on their perceptions. As scientists, we addressed the big question of how those perceptions arise by employing the small-question tools of our field—studies designed to disentangle the complex processes shaping all behavior. Building on basic research into how people think, feel, and interact, our work revealed general patterns. Although the piece–and Fischhoff’s research–is geared toward how the general public might perceive risks raised by the chemical industry, it sounds like some of the work could be applied to improve communication of safety concerns to laboratory or manufacturing workers. Fischhoff includes some resources in the...

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Journal of Chemical Health & Safety, September-October issue
Nov29

Journal of Chemical Health & Safety, September-October issue

Here’s what was in the September-October issue of the Journal of Chemical Health & Safety. The theme of the issue was implementation of the Occupational Safety & Health Administration’s Laboratory Standard, drawn from a symposium held at the Fall 2015 ACS meeting in Boston. Editorial: The Lab Standard at 25, by Harry J. Elston Strategy of the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research to influence laboratory safety among its funded researchers, by Steve Rupkey (Argonne National Laboratory) Reflections of a former OSHA official on the laboratory standard, by Fred Malaby The impact of OSHA’s Laboratory Standard on undergraduate safety education, by Robert H. Hill Jr. (Battelle) Where are we with lab safety education: Who, what, when, where, and how?, by Kenneth P. Fivizzani Should science departments have their own safety personnel? – An assessment of a centralized approach, by Kamilah Hylton (University of Technology, Jamaica) Laboratory safety: Engaging 600+ research groups, by Stephanie Tumidajski (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) The Laboratory Safety Standard at 25: Implementation of the Standard through the Chemical Hygiene Plan and the Chemical Hygiene Officer – Is it trickling down?, by Miriam Weil (Boston Children’s Hospital) Process dynamics and safety, by Dennis C. Hendershot (AIChE’s Center for Chemical Process Safety) Enhance, don’t interfere, by Neal Langerman (Advanced Chemical...

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Journal of Chemical Health & Safety, July-August issue
Nov16

Journal of Chemical Health & Safety, July-August issue

Here’s what was in the July-August issue of the Journal of Chemical Health & Safety: Editorial: Rainbows revisited and unintended consequences, by Harry J. Elston Promoting a culture of safety in academic chemistry, statements by American Chemical Society presidential candidates, Peter K. Dorhout (Kansas State University) and Thomas R. Gilbert (Northeastern University), candidates for American Chemical Society president Evaluation of safety climate at a major public university, by Jerry E. Steward, Vincent L. Wilson, and Wei-Hsung Wang (Louisiana State University) A case history of requalifying an older laboratory hood for use, by Lee C. Cadwallader and Robert J. Pawelko (Idaho National Laboratory) Hazards associated with laboratory scale hydrogenations, by Tilak Chandra and Jeffrey P. Zebrowski (University of Wisconsin, Madison) An evaluation of diesel particulate matter in fire station vehicle garages and living quarters, by Ryan L. Payne, Victor M. Alaves, Rodney R. Larson, and Darrah K. Sleeth (University of Utah) A new quantitative method for testing performance of in-use laboratory chemical fume hoods, by Kwangseog Ahn (University of Wisconsin, Whitewater; Michael J. Ellenbecker and Susan R. Woskie (University of Massachusetts, Lowell); and Louis J. DiBerardinis (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Baseline survey on the implementation of laboratory chemical safety, health and security within health faculties laboratories at Universitas Indonesia, by Fatma Lestari, Budiawan, Meily L. Kurniawidjaja, and Budi Hartono (Universitas Indonesia) Adipic acid, by William E. Luttrell and Garrett R. Klaassen (Oklahoma Christian University) Mini factories and process safety, by Dennis C. Hendershot (AIChE’s Center for Chemical Process Safety) Safety as a “core value” in academia, by Neal Langerman (Advanced Chemical Safety) Toxic tips: Propylene, by William E. Luttrell and Nathaniel P. Giles (Oklahoma Christian...

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