Art conservation that does more harm than good
Aug07

Art conservation that does more harm than good

Hindsight is 20-20, as they say. This week Art Daily* reported that a widespread preservation treatment, developed to help canvases survive humid environments, actually makes paintings more vulnerable when humidity levels soar.** “The wax-resin treatment was enormously popular in Europe and the U.S. during the 1950s and 1960s,” says Cecil Krarup Andersen at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, who made the discovery. “Many...

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Daisies, frankincense, mint, and mercury help preserve Richard the Lionheart’s heart
Mar07

Daisies, frankincense, mint, and mercury help preserve Richard the Lionheart’s heart

This is a guest blog post from Stu Borman, a C&EN senior correspondent for science, technology & education. A French-based research team recently had a rare opportunity to get to the heart—quite literally—of some 12th century European history. Using a battery of scientific equipment, they took a closer look at how the heart of English king Richard I was preserved for posterity. Also known as Richard the Lionheart because of...

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Photo fraud: eBay to the rescue!
Feb25

Photo fraud: eBay to the rescue!

In the 1990s the market for photos exploded. As snapshots started selling for millions of dollars, sham photos also slipped into the fray before the art world had any way to authenticate originals. And so cultural heritage researchers had to play some serious catch-up, and quickly. That’s the gist of my recent cover story on photo conservation. It explores how two fraud cases helped turn the field from a niche research area to a...

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Two million-year-old whale fossils printed with 3D technology
Feb17

Two million-year-old whale fossils printed with 3D technology

These may look like real fossils, but they are actually perfect plastic replicas of 2 million-year-old whale skeletons made using a 3D printer. This printing technology, which can create 3D versions of objects as diverse as a guns or the brain of a man with no memory, was hyped last week by President Obama when he said that 3D printing “has the potential to revolutionize the way we make almost everything.” The technology certainly...

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When a Rembrandt copy is not a forgery
Jan25

When a Rembrandt copy is not a forgery

So you’d think that making a replica of a Rembrandt might be frowned upon by the art world, but this copy of “An old man in military costume” has full approval of its owners. In fact, the folks at the Paul Getty Museum in LA, asked their own intern to replicate the masterpiece as well as the hidden painting beneath it. It seems that there’s a pretty good reason for making the copy, or “mock-up” as the researchers call it. For years,...

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Authenticating Pieces Of The Berlin Wall
Aug13

Authenticating Pieces Of The Berlin Wall

Fifty one years ago today, communist officials in East Germany erected the Berlin Wall to stop the exodus of their citizens to capitalist West Berlin. The 155-km barricade came down 28 years later in 1989, and since then, every self-respecting tourist shop in town sells chunks of spray-painted concrete to anyone seeking a piece of 20th century history. Today’s price for a chunk of the Wall, as determined during my lunch-time walk to...

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