Liveblogging First-Time Disclosures of Drug Structures from #ACSNOLA
Apr04

Liveblogging First-Time Disclosures of Drug Structures from #ACSNOLA

Bookmark this page now, folks. On Wednesday, April 10, I will be here, liveblogging the public debut of five drug candidates’ structures. The “First Time Disclosures” Session at the ACS National Meeting in New Orleans runs from 2PM-4:55PM Central time. I am not able to conjure up a permalink to the session program, so here’s a screengrab instead. 1:20PM I’m in hall R02, where the session’s set to begin in about 40 minutes. Found a seat with a power outlet nearby, so I’m good to go! 2:29PM BMS-906024 Company: Bristol-Myers Squibb Meant to treat: cancers including breast, lung, colon, and leukemia Mode of action: pan-Notch inhibitor Medicinal chemistry tidbit: The BMS team used an oxidative enolate heterocoupling en route to the candidate– a procedure from Phil Baran’s lab at Scripps Research Institute. JACS 130, 11546 Status in the pipeline: Phase I Relevant documents: WO 2012/129353 3:02PM LGX818 Company: Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research and Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation Meant to treat: melanoma with a specific mutation in B-RAF kinase: V600E Mode of action: selective mutant B-RAF kinase inhibitor Status in the pipeline: Phase Ib/II Relevant documents: WO 2011/023773 ; WO 2011/025927 3:47PM AZD5423 Company: AstraZeneca Meant to treat: respiratory diseases, in particular chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Mode of action: non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor modulators Medicinal chemistry tidbit: This compound originated in part from a collaboration with Bayer Pharma. Status in the pipeline: Phase II Relevant documents: WO 2011/061527 ; WO 2010/008341 ; WO 2009/142568 4:17PM Birinapant (formerly known as TL32711) Company: TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals Meant to treat: cancer Mode of action: blocks the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins to reinstate cancer cell death Status in the pipeline: Phase II Relevant documents: US 8,283,372 5:00PM MGL-3196 (previously VIA-3196) Company: Madrigal Pharmaceuticals, acquired from VIA Pharmaceuticals, licensed from Roche Meant to treat: high cholesterol/high triglycerides Mode of action: mimics thyroid hormone, targeted to thyroid hormone receptor beta in the liver Medicinal chemistry tidbit: this molecule was discovered at Roche’s now-shuttered Nutley site. Status in the pipeline: completed Phase I trials Relevant documents: WO 2007/009913 ; WO 2009/037172 And that’s it, folks! Watch the April 22nd issue of C&EN for more on this...

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Rigged Reactions: Biocatalysis Meets 13C NMR
Jul19

Rigged Reactions: Biocatalysis Meets 13C NMR

When you think of reaction screening, what comes to mind? Most would say LC-MS, the pharma workhorse, which shows changes in molecular polarity, mass, and purity with a single injection. Some reactions provide conversion clues, like evolved light or heat. In rare cases, we can hook up an in-line NMR analysis – proton (1H) usually works best due to its high natural abundance (99.9%). Please welcome a new screening technique: 13C NMR. How can that work, given the low, low natural abundance of ~1.1% Carbon-13? Researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center have the answer: rig the system. Jamie Rogers and John MacMillan report in JACS ASAP 13C-labeled versions of several common drug fragments, which they use to screen new biocatalyzed reactions. Biocatalysis = big business for the pharma world. The recent Codexis / Merck partnership for HCV drug boceprevir brought forth an enzyme capable of asymmetric amine oxidation. Directed evolution of an enzyme made sense here, since they knew their target structure, but what if we just want to see if microbes will alter our molecules? Enter the labeled substrates: the researchers remark that they provide an “unbiased approach to biocatalysis discovery.” They’re not looking to accelerate a certain reaction per se, but rather searching for any useful modifications using the 13C “detector” readout. One such labeled substrate, N-(13C)methylindole, shows proof-of-concept with their bacterial library, producing two different products (2-oxindole and 3-hydroxyindole) depending on the amount of oxygen dissolved in the broth. NMR autosamplers make reaction monitoring a snap, and in short order, the scientists show biotransformations of ten more indole substrates. This paper scratches multiple itches for various chem disciplines. Tracking single peaks to test reactions feels spookily close to 31P monitoring of metal-ligand catalysis. Organickers, no strangers to medicinally-relevant indole natural products, now have another stir-and-forget oxidation method. Biochemists will no doubt wish to tinker with each bacterial strain to improve conversion or expand scope. The real question will be how easily we can incorporate 13C labels into aromatic rings and carbon chains, which would greatly increase the overall...

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TEDMED: Andrew Read’s Five Tips For Keeping Superbugs At Bay
Apr13

TEDMED: Andrew Read’s Five Tips For Keeping Superbugs At Bay

Researchers may like to think they’re pretty smart, but you could argue that bacteria have also got some bragging rights. Every day, microbes develop resistance to even the most powerful antibiotics scientists have developed. Andrew Read thinks evolution is the best lens for staring down the superbugs. He took the stage Thursday at TEDMED, where he warned, “we’re picking a fight with natural selection.” “Picking a fight without Darwin is like going to the moon without Newton,” Read added. “We are in the dark ages when it comes to evolutionary management.” Read, director of Penn State University’s Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, sat down with me on Thursday and shared a few principles he thinks the scientific community should keep in mind in order to keep antibiotic resistance in check. Here are his five tips for would-be superbug slayers. Get smart with the drugs you’ve already got. “We can’t rely on a continual supply of new drugs,” Read said. Many firms have already exited antibiotic research, he notes. “You can see that the markets aren’t good enough right now to drive innovation,” since new antibiotics are precious and used only for patients’ most severe infections rather than being prescribed widely. Read says firms should continually evaluate dosing and combination strategies with established drugs in order to stave off resistance. “I’m not saying we shouldn’t discover new antimicrobials,” Read stressed. “In some situations, like malaria, it’s really critical. But we don’t want to put all our eggs in that basket.” Learn from what works. “I think magic bullets are the exception rather than the rule,” Read says. But researchers should focus on why wildly successful therapies were so. “Why was that pathogen unable to get around the smallpox vaccine? Why is chloroquine still working against some malarias in some parts of the world when it’s has failed miserably in others?” Read asked. Make the right matches for combination therapies. Read notes that some antimalarial drug combinations have consisted of drugs with markedly different half-lives. In effect, once the first drug has left the human body, all that’s left is the other drug, a monotherapy. “And that’s dangerous,” a breeding ground for resistance, Read cautions. “You want to be combining drugs that have similar half-lives.” Researchers should also think about whether their antibiotics become more lethal to microbes when used in combination, or less lethal, Read says. Evidence suggests that less lethal is better, he says. According to work from Roy Kishony’s lab at Harvard Medical School, if an antibiotic combo is less lethal, once resistance develops to one drug (call it drug A) in the pair, then drug B can...

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Francis Collins At TEDMED – Repurposing Drugs, Replacing Animal Models, Rocking Out
Apr11

Francis Collins At TEDMED – Repurposing Drugs, Replacing Animal Models, Rocking Out

You know you’re at an interesting conference when the director of the NIH starts off his presentation with a guitar duet, and shares a session with Cookie Monster. But the organizers of TEDMED made a very deliberate decision in opening this year’s conference with Francis Collins. This is the first year that the gathering of medical luminaries, artists, and design gurus (TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design) is taking place in Washington, DC, after moving from San Diego. It marks a philosophical shift for the organization, from TEDMED as idea incubator to TEDMED as inserting itself into the national conversation on health and medicine. What better way to do that then bringing in the head of the biggest biomedical funding agency? Collins wants to compress the time it takes to get a drug development pipeline, and make the pipeline less leaky. This isn’t news to folks around the pharma blogosphere, including here at the Haystack, Ash at Curious Wavefunction and Derek Lowe, who’ve followed last year’s announcement of NIH’s venture for drug discovery, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. Folks have expressed some concerns about the concept, and its emphasis on the promise of gene-based drug discovery. But, as Derek noted, the fact of the matter is that everyone in drug discovery wants the things Collins wants, so there’s a measure of goodwill for the venture too. Collins spent his time on the TEDMED stage emphasizing two things: drug repurposing and developing high-tech cellular solutions to supplement and replace often-imperfect animal models. On the tech side, Collins showcased the Harvard-based Wyss Institute’s lung-on-a-chip, which combines tissue engineering and electronics to mimic the interface between the lung’s air sacs and capillaries (Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.1188302). He said that technologies like this suggest viable alternatives to animal testing are possible. When New Scientist reported on the lung-on-a-chip in 2010, researchers praised it as a step in the right direction, but cautioned that immortalized cell lines, such as those on the chip, don’t neccesarily behave like primary cells from patients. Collins also noted that it might be possible to use such devices with patients’ own cells someday. On the repurposing side, Collins cited an article on the topic in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery (DOI: 10.1038/nrd3473), and alluded to lonafarnib (SCH 66336), a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that was originally designed to be part of cancer-treatment cocktails. It didn’t pan out as a cancer drug, Collins said, but now clinical trials are underway to test whether the drug is effective at countering a rare mutation that causes Hutchinson-Guilford progeria, an ailment that leads to rapid aging in children. Collins shared the stage with 15-year-old Sam,...

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Exploring Rational Drug Design
Feb17

Exploring Rational Drug Design

Medicinal chemists strive to optimize molecules that fit snugly into their proposed targets. But in the quest for potency, we often overlook the local physics that govern drugs’ binding to these receptors. What if we could rationally predict which drugs bind well to their targets? A new review, currently out on J. Med. Chem. ASAP, lays out all the computational backing behind this venture. Three computational chemists (David Huggins, Woody Sherman, and Bruce Tidor) break down five binding events from the point-of-view of the drug target: Shape Complementarity, Electrostatics, Protein Flexibility, Explicit Water Displacement, and Allosteric Modulation….whew! Note: Before we dive into this article, let’s clarify a few terms computational drug-hunters use that bench chemists think of differently: ‘decoy’ – a test receptor used to perform virtual screens; ‘ligand’ – the drug docking into the protein; ‘affinity / selectivity’ – a balance of characteristics, or how tightly something binds vs. which proteins it binds to; ‘allosteric’ – binding of a drug molecule to a different site on an enzyme than the normal active site. Regular readers and fans of compu-centric chem blogs such as The Curious Wavefunction and Practical Fragments will feel right at home! We’ll start at the top. Shape complementarity modeling uses small differences in a binding pocket, such as a methylene spacer in a residue (say, from a Val to Ile swap) to dial-in tighter binding between a target and its decoy. The authors point out that selectivity can often be enhanced by considering a drug that’s literally too big to fit into a related enzymatic cavity. They provide several other examples with a ROCK-1 or MAP kinase flavor, and consider software packages designed to dock drugs into the “biologically active” conformation of the protein. Electrostatic considerations use polar surface maps, the “reds” and “blues” of a receptor’s electronic distribution, to show how molecular contacts can help binding to overcome the desolvation penalty (the energy cost involved in moving water out and the drug molecule in). An extension of this basic tactic, charge optimization screening, can be used to test whole panels of drugs against dummy receptors to determine how mutations might influence drug binding. Because target proteins move and shift constantly, protein flexibility, the ability of the protein to adapt to a binding event, is another factor worth considering. The authors point out that many kinases possess a “DFG loop” region that can shift and move to reveal a deeper binding cavity in the kinase, which can help when designing binders (for a collection of several receptors with notoriously shifty binding pockets – sialidase, MMPs, cholinesterase – see p. 534 of Teague’s NRDD review). But these...

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How Jagabandhu Das made dasatinib possible
Jan16

How Jagabandhu Das made dasatinib possible

In my story on how drugs get their generic names for this week’s issue of C&EN, I briefly discussed how the chronic myelogenous leukemia medication Sprycel (dasatinib), mentioned in this Haystack post by SeeArrOh, ended up being named after Bristol-Myers Squibb research fellow Jagabandhu Das. Even though Das, or Jag, as his coworkers call him, didn’t discover the molecule that bears his name, the program leader for Das’s team, Joel Barrish, says dasatinib wouldn’t have existed without him. So how’d Das make a difference? About one and a half years into the search for a kinase inhibitor that might be able to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia, “we were hitting a wall,” Barrish, today vice-president of medicinal chemistry at BMS, recalls. “We couldn’t get past a certain level of potency.” Early on, the team’s work suggested that a 4′-methyl thiazole was critical for potency. Replace the methyl with a hydrogen, and potency went out the window. But Das challenged that dogma, Barrish says. He thought the compound series had evolved to the point where it would be a good idea to go back and test those early assumptions. His hunch paid off– in the new, later kinase inhibitor series, it turned out that removing the methyl group from the thiazole actually boosted potency. Thanks in large part to that discovery, the team eventually was able to make kinase inhibitors with ten thousand fold higher activity. “Jag didn’t stop there,” Barrish says. After debunking the methyl dogma, Das found a way to replace an undesirable urea moiety in the team’s inhibitors with a pyrimidine group, which improved the inhibitors’ physical properties. With help from Das’s two insights combined, eventually BMS’s team came up with the molecule that became dasatinib (J. Med. Chem., DOI: 10.1021/jm060727j). Generic naming requirements are extensive, but the committees involved in the naming process are willing to use inventors’ names as long as they fit the criteria. But sometimes, Barrish says, “there’s luck involved in who makes the final compound.” In the dasatinib story, though, it was clear that Das’s discoveries were the keys to success. When dasatinib was in clinical trials and it came time to put forward a set of possible generic names for consideration, Barrish didn’t have to think too hard about who was most responsible for his team’s success. “It was very clear in my mind that it was Jag,” he says. So he added dasatinib to the list. “I admit, it was one of those things you do and you kind of forget about it, thinking, ‘oh, they’ll pick something else’,” Barrish says. When dasatinib ended up being the name of choice, he...

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