Science Policy and Communication
Dec06

Science Policy and Communication

The post du jour is by Paul Vallett, a grad student in physical chemistry  at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He's got a shiny new blog called electron cafe where he discusses his research, energy, and science policy (I highly recommend the Explosion Fridays). So true to his usual topics, he wrote a bit for us about science policy. Share and enjoy. When was the last time you attended a talk outside of your specific area of research? I study physical chemistry and recently went to a talk by Dr Paul Nurse, a 2001 Nobel Laureate in Physiology/Medicine. I don’t have a strong background in biochemistry, but background in biochemistry, but how often do you get the chance to hear a Nobel Laureate speak? I went with my whole lab group and found a packed auditorium. After the talk our lab heartily agreed that Dr.Nurse was an excellent speaker but that we all had no idea what he was really talking about. This is not meant to be a slight on Dr. Nurse, because I am sure that if he attended one of our physical chemistry seminars he would have a similar experience. Scientists and researchers typically can easily communicate within their own research community but those outside the community cannot penetrate the barrier of scientific terms, jargon, and basic knowledge of the field needed to achieve full understanding of the work. If this is a problem for scientists who are from somewhat similar scientific disciplines, imagine the difficulty that someone without a scientific background will have when attempting to understand the importance of research results. This is a problem that plagues decision makers that require the findings of scientific research to create sound policy but do not have the time to sift through reams of published papers in an attempt to understand the results. This is where scientists who are able to have a deep understanding of research and can still communicate effectively with a broad audience are extremely valuable. Entering the field of science and technology policy is an option for those who wish to leave the laboratory behind but have a desire to use their technical background in a manner that has direct impact on policy decisions made. Here are a few opportunities in policy that you can explore while enrolled in graduate school and after graduation. Certificate Programs Graduate certificates are earned alongside your normal degree, similar to a minor on an undergraduate degree and are meant to supplement your program's coursework. Many graduate institutions now offer graduate certificates in the area of science and technology policy. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has...

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Working for The Man
Jul07

Working for The Man

THE GOVERNMENT. It sounds a little scary, doesn't it? After all, THE GOVERNMENT is who tells you what to do and takes your money once a year. But they do good stuff too, like that whole, you know, constitution and bill of rights thing. Plus they employ a whole lot of chemists. Surprised? I kind of was. I was tooling around on USAJOBS.gov the other day, and just did a quick search for 'chemist.' And great googly moogly! There were A TON. And I just want to clarify that these aren't jobs in government labs like PNNL or Brookhaven--that's something totally different. This is a job list for government agencies, and these were just some of the ones I saw: NASA The Army The Navy The Air Force (sadly did not see any for the Marines) FDA Agricultural Research Service DEA FBI Homeland Security Most of these jobs listed are research jobs, so if you want to avoid industry or academia but want to stay in the lab, this may be the course for you. I should also add that many government jobs require that you be a US citizen (not necessarily born here, but naturalized). And pass a background check. And....anything else? Since I've never held a government job, I asked my friend John Spencer who's a project manager for Crane Naval Surface Warfare Center in southern Indiana, part of the Department of Defense. Hi, John! John says hi. He also said that his application was a little different than most, since he started out as a contractor for Crane. But yes, expect a background check. A lengthy one. His was about a 30-page document that asked for information including every place he's lived for the past seven years, all his employers in that time, all the schools he attended in that time, any foreign travel and foreign contacts, his family relationships and their nationalities, et cetera, et cetera. What you'll get asked also depends on the level of security of the job you're applying for. I'm assuming that the check for the FBI might be a titch different than the one for the USDA, but we know what happens when we assume... John likes working for the government. Like any other job, it's got its perks and disadvantages. File under perks: the pay is good (generally somewhere between academia and industry pay), and the people tend to be intelligent. Plus if you like variety, it's easy to move around, John said. He's had three different jobs in the three years he's worked at Crane. Job security is another benefit of government work. Once you get hired, it's...

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