↓ Expand ↓
» About This Blog

Banking On A Bunker To Save Britain’s Film

Cellulose nitrate degradation that the BFI aims to avoid with their new archive. Credit: BFI

If I had to marry an inanimate object, I would not choose the Berlin Wall as Eija-Riitta has, but I might be tempted by a bunker, possibly the Boros bunker, whose dark history has been reclaimed by great art.

So you can imagine that I was super interested in a recent Guardian article about a new archive for the British Film Institute, which will be located on top of the site of an old nuclear bunker.

The BFI is facing what’s already a become a major problem for many who possess collections of early cinema: How do you keep 450,000 cans of film from breaking down, particularly when the film is made of cellulose nitrate, a plastic not known for its longevity?

When cellulose nitrate breaks down, it causes the release of nitric acid, which can accelerate degradation in nearby film. Eventually all the degradation results in a gooey or powdery mess where there was once a fantastic film.

The BFI’s spokesperson Brian Robinson told me that in the new archive, fragile film will be kept at -5 C, which is “down a notch” from the previous temperature (3-4 C) that the film was stored at. According to studies done at the BFI, Robinson says that the cellulose nitrate degradation will “be arrested.”

I can’t imagine that it’s ever possible to completely arrest degradation, but I’m guessing the drop in temperature seriously decreases the rate of chemical breakdown.

Finally, Robinson says the new £12 million facility will be well-ventilated, which I presume will suck away any amount of nitric acid that has managed to percolate off the valuable film.

1 Comment

  • Aug 31st 201119:08
    by John Spevacek

    Reply

    Such significant changes for a 10 degree C change does seem unusually high (haven’t we all learned that lacking any data, the rate should be twice as slow for a 10 C chnage?)
    The Tg of nitrocellulose is ~ 50 C, so it can’t even be argued that that is a factor.

  • Leave a Reply


    seven + = 14