Vincent Van Gogh’s Last Months

Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers. Credit: Wikimedia commons.

In the last year of Vincent van Gogh’s life, as his mental illness escalated and before his suicide in 1890, the Dutch impressionist painter voluntarily committed himself in to two French hospitals.

The isolation didn’t thwart van Gogh’s productivity–he painted some 200 paintings during the 15 months he spent in treatment. Nor did the isolation prevent him from experimenting with trendy new pigments bequeathed by the industrial revolution, such as chrome yellow, which he used to paint his famous sunflower series. This pigment fell out of favor by the 1950s when its lead and chromate make-up was found to be toxic.

Unfortunately, chrome yellow and other then-trendy pigments degrade if they are exposed to light. For example, the degradation turns the bright yellow pigment into a rather sad looking green color. Earlier this year Koen Janssens, at the University of Antwerp, in Belgium, explained the chemistry behind this degradation, by using X-ray spectroscopy to show that when the chromium in the yellow paint was subjected to too much light, it went from a hexavalent state to a trivalent state. Many media outlets reported on the discovery, including C&EN and Newscientist.

The MOLAB van on the road in Greece. Credit: MOLAB.

Now Janssens has turned his attention to the so-called red lake pigments that van Gogh used in paintings during the 15 months of his life. Janssens recruited the help of MOLAB, a group of roaming scientists who travel around Europe with high tech, portable equipment. Their gear can help him study light degradation of the valuable art without harming it.

Last week, the MOLAB team, aka CHARISMA, drove 1500km from Perugia, Italy, to the Kröller-Müller Museum, in Otterlo, in the Netherlands. The Kröller-Müller has 22 paintings from van Gogh’s last months of life, and with the help of the mobile lab, the researchers can study the red pigment degradation without moving or harming the artwork.

Hopefully the new research will clarify the chemistry of the paint breakdown so that further degradation of van Gogh’s work can be avoided.

I can’t help thinking about the tragic irony of it all… that as van Gogh’s mental health was rapidly deteriorating, he was expressing himself using paint that was itself unstable.

Author: Sarah Everts

Share This Post On