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  1. e
    July 4, 2011 • 4:38 pm

    Thanks Sarah for your great post. I remember an article in the NYorker about a potential forger living in Toronto. Sorry I don’t remember more (maybe someone does?), but if I am correct they resorted to analysis of the chemicals to try to make sense of the claims. It would be interesting how the fractal method compares…

  2. Sarah Everts
    July 4, 2011 • 4:51 pm

    Sounds like a great article. I just searched the New Yorker site and came up with this piece about looking for artist fingerprints on masterpieces… http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/07/12/100712fa_fact_grann

  3. e
    July 4, 2011 • 9:09 pm

    yep. That is exactly that I had in mind.

  4. e
    July 4, 2011 • 9:12 pm

    *what I had

  5. Vivian M
    July 4, 2011 • 9:51 pm

    Watching the old video I was left wondering if evidence of cigarette ash could help confirm a Pollock painting?
    Another great post, Sarah. I learn something new every time.

  6. Sarah Everts
    July 5, 2011 • 10:57 am

    Thanks Vivian. Your suggestion that the cigarette ash be a smoking gun gives me a great opportunity to make a terrible pun. :) But seriously, if cigarette ash were to be used in authentication, I’m guessing there would have be some analytical way of connecting the ash back to Pollock, or the geographical location where he worked. Perhaps isotopes of carbon in the ash could be used as a forensic fingerprint: http://pubs.acs.org/cen/science/89/8926sci1.html

  7. Chrys Riviere-Blalock
    July 26, 2011 • 6:09 pm

    Chemistry instructor colleague sent this article to me. I look for ways to try to explain to my art history students that Pollock’s work “carries” a kind of energy when you stand in front of one of his paintings and view it. It’s an odd and unexplainable thing (for me) but something that is very real- and something a photo in their text book or online can not replicate. This article may touch at an explanation of that phenomenon (the relationship to nature via fractals) which is so real to those who give his work the time and sensitivity to become aware of that effect on the viewer. I’ll be sharing your article with my art history students!

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